CK Tools :) The professionals choice when it comes to Electrical Tools
This official sponsor may provide discounts for members

Discuss 20V to ground in the Electrical Engineering Chat area at ElectriciansForums.net

Welcome to ElectriciansForums.net - The American Electrical Advice Forum
Head straight to the main forums to chat by click here:  American Electrical Advice Forum

Hi, I'm on vacation in Panama and got a minor electrical shock twice toughing the oven. Strangely now I can't reproduce it.
In the power outlet the tension to ground is 20V against both power cables. Between them it's 112V.
What's wrong with the ground?
Can that be the reason for the shock?
 
Aico Carbon Monoxide Detectors
This official sponsor may provide discounts for members

Lucien Nunes

-
Mentor
Arms
Esteemed
The ground is probably disconnected, and the shock is caused by leakage from the oven. The amount of leakage will vary as the heating elements are warmed and cooled, and your resistance to ground will vary, so you might not always get shocked.

The disconnected ground would also explain the apparent anomaly that 2 x 20V does not make 112V - the measurement you are taking to ground is not a true voltage measurement, it's a comparison of the insulation resistance with the input resistance of your voltmeter, and the figure it displays is arbitrary. With the oven connected, you might find it reaches almost 112V to neutral, hence the shock.

In the UK it would be considered dangerous and would be isolated and repaired before use.
 
SuperlecDirect - ElectriciansForums.net Electrical Suppliers
This official sponsor may provide discounts for members

Reply to 20V to ground in the Electrical Engineering Chat area at ElectriciansForums.net

uHeat Banner - Forum Discount Available
This official sponsor may provide discounts for members
Top Bottom