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Discuss 220V AC Flow Control in the Electrical Wiring, Theories and Regulations area at ElectriciansForums.net

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Hey there!

I am kind of new into the AC/DC. My knowledge is mostly in the low voltage DC level. I am asking some of the specialists here.
What IC or special wiring I need so I can be sure that 220V up to 10A can flow only in one direction, as shown on the image attached.

Thank you in advance!
 

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static zap

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Advent Win
An answer could be given , but we need reassurance of your safety !
If you are going to "realize" a physical circuit , attached to live 220V current (with many 100's of amps available ) I would advise don't.
..or is this just theory..
(We need more about the situation to give you a safe answer )
 
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  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #3
An answer could be given , but we need reassurance of your safety !
If you are going to "realize" a physical circuit , attached to live 220V current (with many 100's of amps available ) I would advise don't.
..or is this just theory..
(We need more about the situation to give you a safe answer )

Dont worry, I rewire majority of my apt. We have 220V on 16amps safety switches. I am developing independent electronic device which will monitor the switch. I just need to be sure when I turn the el ON, the flow will go the same way as the manual switch. Can I use zenner diode on 20amps?
An answer could be given , but we need reassurance of your safety !
If you are going to "realize" a physical circuit , attached to live 220V current (with many 100's of amps available ) I would advise don't.
..or is this just theory..
(We need more about the situation to give you a safe answer )
First, thx for taking the time and interest in responding to my request. Second, I did thr rewiring of my apt, installed switches, sockets, etc. We have old school communist system, 220V with 16amp switches. So, I know the danger and have been stunned couple of times. So, I am all good. Is there anything like zenner diode or something?
 

static zap

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Advent Win
If your system is AC there is no diode equivalent.
If you wish to generate high current DC , supply transformers prefer you use both cycles to stay balanced. How fast a flow control do you need .
(simple on off like a relay - or pulsed like Switch mode power supply) --( 2nd option beyond me).
Still finding you diagram a little confusing , are there two independant 220V AC supplies , or are they the same ,but arriving 2 different routes.
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #5
If your system is AC there is no diode equivalent.
If you wish to generate high current DC , supply transformers prefer you use both cycles to stay balanced. How fast a flow control do you need .
(simple on off like a relay - or pulsed like Switch mode power supply) --( 2nd option beyond me).
Still finding you diagram a little confusing , are there two independant 220V AC supplies , or are they the same ,but arriving 2 different routes.
ONE supply, 2(TWO) different routes, but independent. When the manual switch is on, I dont care, because the load will consume the electricity and draw the current. Even a small leakage might gonna go thru the relay, it would be fine. No danger or hazard will be created. When I use the electronic device to turn the load, the voltage will come to the manual switch, and that might be problematic.
 

static zap

-
Advent Win
Sounds like you need a , multi-pole C/O relay electronically activated ,
that when inactive ,allows switch to function.
But when active , breaks switch path and has a separate path for power independent of switch.
(Must consider currents that could weld contacts.)
So long as your 1 direction requirement is not DC at output.
(If you do need rectified DC ,that will be a transformer and bridge rectifier )- I think confusion is with explanation !
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #7
Sounds like you need a , multi-pole C/O relay electronically activated ,
that when inactive ,allows switch to function.
But when active , breaks switch path and has a separate path for power independent of switch.
(Must consider currents that could weld contacts.)
So long as your 1 direction requirement is not DC at output.
(If you do need rectified DC ,that will be a transformer and bridge rectifier )- I think confusion is with explanation !
I find a solution on my own. It seems when dealing with High V and Amps at the same time, the device sizes grow exponentially.
What will I do, you ask? Let me explain.
I will put a 1 or 2 relay, 4 etc relay switch(depend on the loops i need to control) and wire it to NC. Also place ACS712 to monitor for amps, In this case I can monitor and control the
Sounds like you need a , multi-pole C/O relay electronically activated ,
that when inactive ,allows switch to function.
But when active , breaks switch path and has a separate path for power independent of switch.
manual switch and prohibit reverse AC flow up to 270V and 10amps. Can you dig it?
Sounds like you need a , multi-pole C/O relay electronically activated ,
that when inactive ,allows switch to function.
But when active , breaks switch path and has a separate path for power independent of switch.
(Must consider currents that could weld contacts.)
So long as your 1 direction requirement is not DC at output.
(If you do need rectified DC ,that will be a transformer and bridge rectifier )- I think confusion is with explanation !
Exactly and I have the solution, amigo. Just wanted to find out if there is any small IC. I guess when you start dealing with HIGH V n Amps, things grow exponentially.
Thank you for your time!
 

davesparks

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Mentor
Arms
Esteemed
ONE supply, 2(TWO) different routes, but independent. When the manual switch is on, I dont care, because the load will consume the electricity and draw the current. Even a small leakage might gonna go thru the relay, it would be fine. No danger or hazard will be created. When I use the electronic device to turn the load, the voltage will come to the manual switch, and that might be problematic.
So you are connecting a manual switch and an electronically controlled switch in parallel.
This doesn't require any special components or reverse current flow detection. Just make sure the manual switch and the relay are taking their feed from the same fuse or circuit breaker.
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #9
So you are connecting a manual switch and an electronically controlled switch in parallel.
This doesn't require any special components or reverse current flow detection. Just make sure the manual switch and the relay are taking their feed from the same fuse or circuit breaker.
They are! The problem is when I let the AC flow thru the electronic device the manual switch will be also under AC(at least up to the connector), since i can't guarantee the load will swallow the current, or it will be functional.
So you are connecting a manual switch and an electronically controlled switch in parallel.
This doesn't require any special components or reverse current flow detection. Just make sure the manual switch and the relay are taking their feed from the same fuse or circuit breaker.
They are on one fuse, but the problem is if the load doesn't swallow the AC I will put the manual switch under el. current, won't it?
So, I want that small section to be isolated and allow the flow to go only in the direction: towards the load.
 

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davesparks

-
Mentor
Arms
Esteemed
They are on one fuse, but the problem is if the load doesn't swallow the AC I will put the manual switch under el. current, won't it?
So, I want that small section to be isolated and allow the flow to go only in the direction: towards the load.
Loads don't 'swallow' the AC as you put it. The load will draw only the current it requires, regardless of how many switches are closed in parallel.
When the electronic switch is closed (on) then yes there will be a live voltage at the outgoing side of the manual switch, but no current will flow in to the switch if it is open (off) as there is no load for the current to flow through.

If both the electronic and manual switch are closed (on) at the same time then the load current will divide between them. You will get half of the load current flowing through each switch, but the total current flowing through the load will be the same.
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #11
They are! The problem is when I let the AC flow thru the electronic device the manual switch will be also under AC(at least up to the connector), since i can't guarantee the load will swallow the current, or it will be functional.

They are on one fuse, but the problem is if the load doesn't swallow the AC I will put the manual switch under el. current, won't it?
So, I want that small section to be isolated and allow the flow to go only in the direction: towards the load.

Thank you.
Loads don't 'swallow' the AC as you put it. The load will draw only the current it requires, regardless of how many switches are closed in parallel.
When the electronic switch is closed (on) then yes there will be a live voltage at the outgoing side of the manual switch, but no current will flow in to the switch if it is open (off) as there is no load for the current to flow through.

If both the electronic and manual switch are closed (on) at the same time then the load current will divide between them. You will get half of the load current flowing through each switch, but the total current flowing through the load will be the same.
Mr. Dave Sparks aka the English man. I used the word "swallow" just to be more descriptive. I am sorry if I have offended you in some way or form. Vlad can only say one thing to you. Thank you!
 

static zap

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Advent Win
(may want to label equipment ,that it is controlled by by Manual + Automatic/Electronic control-- Just in case anyone pokes about inside trusting just 1 manual switch )
 
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