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Hi all,

Firstly what is the current regulation with regards to fire rated downlights ? I understand that they must be installed now in all downstairs rooms to help prevent fire spreading to the upstairs. However all the voids that i have seen between ceiling and floorboards to upstairs do not have enough space to allow for these, as the fittings are twice the height of standard ones, and they require a 10cm clearance above them ??? So what are you supposed to do ??

Also i am curious as to why all the wholesalers are still selling old style consumer units, such as non rcd protected, and dual boards, and in some places i have even seen rewirable types still for sale ?? How can they still sell these if the current regulations do not allow them to be installed ??

Thanks

Darren.
 
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scotsparky

-
Arms
Dazza see 422.4 which gives a good run throught og the regs for spotlights. Ther aer also small fireprooof caps you can get for above the fitting as well (cant remember the name.

As for the BS3036 boards and old 16th edition boards selling them is not a problem its up to the installer to comply with regs not the wholesaler
 
S

Spudnik

Nearly all fire rated down lights will fit between ceiling and floor above.

However, there is more and more call for insulation in this void also, so you need to ensure that either the fibre glass is kept clear, or fit low energy fittings and not worry about the insulation.

As for the CU's as above really. You can still install standard split loaders. You just need to install RCBO's on the circuits that are not protected by the RCD. This will more than likely end up more expensive than fitting a 17th CU.
 
E

electro

Hi


As regard to the fuse boards, there is no such thing as a 17th edition board or a 16th edition board, sceptics would say its a marketing tool, or they are helping you achieve that regulation. There are still many circuits and installations that don't require rcd/rcbos so selling these older type boards can help the cost of the installation. Remember a good sparkie/designer chooses his distribution board not the wholesaler.

Regards
 
S

spark1

I fully agree with electro, it is us sparks ..ie. the designers of the installation who should be determining which type of c.u. to install.....some installs require rcd protection ...some do not...hence the availability of choice from the suppliers.


spark1
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #6
Which installs dont require rcd protection ??
I thought the 17th edition states that all new installs must be rcd protected ?
 
A

acat

Hi Darren

Dont think so if you have a copy of BS7671 to hand have a look at 411.3.3 and 415.1 both mention additional protection for sockets by way of an RCD. To my mind if it was a basic requirement for RCD protection it would not quote additional protection.

Hope that helps

Chris
 

scotsparky

-
Arms
Which installs dont require rcd protection ??
I thought the 17th edition states that all new installs must be rcd protected ?
(General rule is ts final circuits under 32A and all circuits in special location.
I dont think distibution circuits dont need RCD protection
 
S

Spudnik

Chaps.

Sockets are now required to have RCD protection regardless.

However, ALL circuits need RCD protection unless installation methods dictate otherwise (earthed steel conduit or buried greater than 50mm from surface etc), including distribution circuits.
 
E

electro

Chaps.

Sockets are now required to have RCD protection regardless.

However, ALL circuits need RCD protection unless installation methods dictate otherwise (earthed steel conduit or buried greater than 50mm from surface etc), including distribution circuits.

sorry jason quote not true there are exceptions for socket outlets

1, for use under the supervision of skilled or instructed persons.
2, a specific labelled or identified socket outlet.

all circuits dont need rcd protection, you could install them in none earthed conduit, plastic conduit and trunking surfaced and over 32amps i.e cooker circuit without socket outlet, lighting (none SL).

hope this clears this up

regards
 
S

Spudnik

sorry jason quote not true there are exceptions for socket outlets

1, for use under the supervision of skilled or instructed persons.
2, a specific labelled or identified socket outlet.

all circuits dont need rcd protection, you could install them in none earthed conduit, plastic conduit and trunking surfaced and over 32amps i.e cooker circuit without socket outlet, lighting (none SL).

hope this clears this up

regards
Good point about the instructed persons or labeled bit, however its not often this can be used in a domestic situation. Cant imagine anyone being happy with some conduit or trunking running through the house!

Must admit, i dont even consider this anymore and just RCD sockets regardless. Never any comebacks then.
 
E

electro

I do agree its best to install all domestics with RCD's even if surface. The problem I have many electricians don't know why or when to install RCD's just install them, so I thought its best to put the information out there and let the guys decide..


Regards
 
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