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Discuss An Australian Dream or visa for some in the Australian Electrician Advice forum area at ElectriciansForums.net

M

MKS

I wrote this in another forum, so hope it might help a few out! I am quite often asked "what is it you need to do to get a work visa for Australia?". Firstly, I am fortunate to hold dual nationalities, so can offer a little insight into those that want to enjoy the Australian way of life. I must make it quite clear that I myself did not go the skilled visa route, but met and married an Australian girl whilst on holiday 12 years ago. However, I do hold an unrestricted licence for the state of South Australia. I must digress, that I did not do an apprentice or a 5 week course, but started out as an electricians mate. I put myself through college for nigh on four years and have done numerous other courses in between. In South Australia, I worked for one of the biggest contractors in the state and my background is mainly commercial, with the odd bit of industrial and domestic. Domestic in South Australia is seen as second class to Commercial and Industrial, not my thoughts, but the thoughts of many Australian sparks, often called 'Cottaging' a derogatory term, but used nonetheless. Wages in Australia vary from $30 a hour to $110 a hour, which is around £22 to £70 respectively in GBP. You pay tax and superannuation which is your pension fund for when you retire, this can of course be topped up and is well worth doing. There is something called salary sacrifice which allows you to pay less tax, but helps you towards things such as a new car, mortgage, loans etc etc, I don't know much about it has never had need to use it. More often than not working hours are from 7am to 3pm, depending on the heat, and trust me, it gets very very hot. People complain about working here in the summer in lofts, try doing it in 45+ degree heat outside, then you will need to complain lol... You get a paid Rostered Day off [RDO] each month. The majority of sparks are union members and it is very much worth joining as the 'Unions' have a big voice there. Most if not all supply you with a van, uniform, mobile phone and petrol subs depending on the distance you need to travel, although this can be offset against your tax each year and a rebate sort. Ok moving on, so again bear with me as my computer has a tendency to auto delete... There are two routes, vocational education and training assessment [Vetassess], which is done in the UK, which gets you your skilled Visa and Australian Recognised Trade Certificate [ATRC] which is your recognition of your qualifications via the You +1'd this publicly. Trades Recognition Australia [TRA] in Australia. Vetasses is the skilled migrant route who will assess your qualifications and advise on what you need to do. This is fairly easy if you have the right qualifications of course. You will sit a practical similar to the AM2 and some kind of theory at a college in England somewhere, but I forget where. The cost is around £1,600, which I know is a huge chunk of cash and no resit for free if you fail. Once you have your skilled visa, you can begin the long arduous task of other required documents, this includes police checks, complete medicals and family history background. They want to know absolutely everything, including how many times a day you sit on the toilet. I think the process is around 18 months, but not too sure as not done this route, so this part is just brief sorry... Please; please take note, this will only get you the skilled visa, it will not by any stretch of the cerebral get you ATRC, that you need to do when you are in Australia. Although I know some have done whilst in England and used a friends address. Now here is a tip... If your partner is the one doing the skilled migrant route, you can go direct to ATRC as long as you have an Aussie address and start on your ATRC, this is not something that they like you to do, so be cautious if you go this route. The ATRC and the TRA... Be fore warned and no disrespect to anyone out there. TRA will NOT recognise any five week course whatsoever...I know a few that have been turned away with a direct 'Come back, when you have more skills' ATRC - To gain ATRC, which is the required documents to help you gain a license, you must have served an approved apprenticeship or other. Other by the way means, electrical improver, adult trainee/mate with the necessary qualifications, these include City and Guilds 2360, 2330, 2391, 2382, NVQ etc etc etc. They highly regard the JIB; sorry, but that is the way they are - unfortunately. They also look favourably upon other qualifications you might have whether that would be IPAF (Scissor/boom), Heatlh and Safety etc etc. Experience is 4 years for apprentice and 7 years for other. Experience must be proven by the way of checkable references, statutory declarations, portfolios of work, photographs. You need to write down everything you have - in bullet points is the best idea. How you use tools, what kind of tools, equipment, wiring systems, how you isolate, find faults, repair faults, experience you have in commercial, domestic, industrial, experience in the lay of cable tray, ladder, basket, health and safety etc etc etc. They expect you to know everything about the work you undertake. Some people I know sent in documents over 200 pages long, big huge portfolios, references, photographs etc etc, it is a minefield... Once you send it in, you then wait, twiddling thumbs etc.... You have a few scenarios to consider, that is you get your ATRC, you get provisional but have a question and answer session over the phone, where questions vary from Motors to differing cable sizes, RCDs, Earthing Arrangements, DOL Starters etc etc. Or they could say, thanks but no thanks, go back to college or in this case TAFE and get some more skill behind you... Have known a few that have had to go back for up to a year, I did for three months. Having your ATRC, is it finally over?...Unfortunately not !... Once you have your ATRC, you can then apply through Peer Training in Adelaide to sit your wiring regs course. This is similar to the 17th edition, but slightly harder I found...The book is quite expensive so beware! Once you have sat and passed this, you can take all your papers to Office of Business and Consumer Affairs and jobs a good un.... Yay an unrestricted license....Woohooo... Now to find work and honestly, if you put the time and effort in, you will get work and the work is consistent.... I do hope this information has been valuable to some members and well; I know, I am back in the UK, but honestly Australia is a very nice place with beautiful women and beaches... Leanne Electrical in SA is owned by an English guy and he values British sparks very highly... So well worth a shot... AS/NZS 3000:2007 (Inc AMD 1) Electrical installations - known as the Australian / New Zealand Wiring Rules - Are the wiring rules book that you need to purchase! Good luck to all!
Please excuse any grammatical errors and mistakes!
 
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S

SparkyBhoy

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #2
This post is brilliant! I am a 21yo newly qualified spark, currently weighing up my options for moving abroad this post saves me alot of time. I know you mentioned the hourly rate was between $30 - $110 but thats a massive difference, what was the average typicall wage on offer for a commercial electrician, if you don't mind me asking.
 
M

MKS

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #3
This post is brilliant! I am a 21yo newly qualified spark, currently weighing up my options for moving abroad this post saves me alot of time. I know you mentioned the hourly rate was between $30 - $110 but thats a massive difference, what was the average typicall wage on offer for a commercial electrician, if you don't mind me asking.
Depends on experience mate. 30 dollars an hour was on average starting out... The top wage is for foremans, chargehands and other things etc!!! :) Drop me a message if you want anymore info...

Regards
 
N

Northring

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #4
Hello MKS, did you find somebody...?
 
M

Marty203

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #6
When I came to Aus in the early 80's I was given a restriced licence and has to sit a test on the Aus wiring rules, how things have changed
 
E

Essexboy7

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #7
Cor! Over here you just get off the bus from eastern europe phone up an agency and say
"please canning help me you,i to make elestrizian vorking good good also have one mans comming good good making electrical vorks good small money"
and you are working as a spark the next day,or if you are English and have absolutely no skills,training or experience pay 6 grand for a 5 week course and you are off calling yourself a spark and expecting to get the same rate as JIB approved time served sparks
 

BLBelfast

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Arms
Just arrived in Perth. I'm a time served approved spark and as I am on a holiday visa for two years there is ****all work in the electrical side I can get. Nightmare. Don't know much about the ARTC but been told it is a long drawn out process and don't know whether to go down that if I'm only here for a few years
 

KennyKen

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Arms
Esteemed
Not only that mate but Australia is heading into recession. They rid out the global 2008 crisis because of the mining boom. Now things are slowing down and commodities are cheaper. Australia is struggling to find its nesh market. After this major project I'm working there is practically nothing. Only small works. Everyone's a sparkie here. So massive completion.
 

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