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Hi all
I am new to this forum and was just wondering any of your advice on tools and anything I should know as I start an apprenticeship next Monday doing most domestic and local leisure centre's

Any advice really appreciated

Dylan :)
 
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T

Toneyz

Are they not going to provide you with a starter too kit and PPE?
Advice -absorb it all in, show an interest AND KEEP YOUR PHONE IN YOUR POCKET until rest breaks unless it is work related.
Be early or on time especially if someone is picking you up.
 

Charlie_

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Arms
Just the very basic hand tools..
Screwdrivers, snips, pliers, hammer.
You will soon suss out what other tools you need as you go along..

Keep yourself busy, there is always something to do.
Don’t wait for instructions; cleaning up will get you lots of gold stars.
Ask questions but not too many :)
 

Andy78

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Mentor
Arms
Esteemed
Dustpan and brush and teaspoon :p

If you search the forum there have been quite a few helpful threads about starter tool kits. Top tip, get as much bought for you from your employer as you can wangle.
 

telectrix

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Mentor
Arms
Esteemed
cheap zet of VDE drivers from Wickes. pair od side cutters, pliers, claw hammer,bolster chisel and scutch chisel as a starter. buy more tools as need arises.
 

buzzlightyear

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Arms
Esteemed
a glass hammer ,a left handed screw driver ,stripped paint for marking out .
andrexx toilet for the boss .LOL.
 

littlespark

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Arms
Esteemed
Advent Win
Don’t go buying all expensive stuff straight away. You’ll only lose it or have it nicked.

On the other hand, you might get lucky and find an Estwing hammer or good screwdriver in an attic or under a floor lost by a previous worker.

A scutch chisel, @telectrix ? Last time I used or even saw one of those was 1996
 
  • Mark anything you buy with a dab or spray of coloured paint (in a location where it won't get worn away in use) so that you can identify your tools.
  • Get a rucksackstyle toolbag so you can carry a good range of tools comfortably.
 

Simon47

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Arms
My advice is :
  • Buy well, buy once. Good quality tools will pay for themselves quickly. For example, you'll curse yourself the first time your cheap screwdriver made of cheese strips the head and makes what should be a simple job into a feature length drama of getting that knackered screw out :mad: That doesn't automatically mean spending lots of money - your new colleagues will be able to give you pointers on what to avoid and what to buy and without breaking the bank.
  • Look after your tools, and they'll thank you by working for you for a long time. Eg, your VDE screwdriver is neither a chisel, a wedge, or a pry bar - if you need to pry something, then use a pry bar (or if you must, a more robust screwdriver that you don't mind damaging).
  • Beware the cadgers. When someone asks to borrow something, check what they want it for. I've had someone just pick up a VDE flat blade (without even asking) to use as a pry bar - he was lucky not to be testing it as a suppository :eek: A mate told me how someone asked to borrow his tin snips - and found out it was to cut some steel wire which would have ruined them. The corrolary of this is be careful with other people's tools - especially as you start out you'll be doing that a lot, get a reputation as someone who looks after them and uses the right tool for the job.
A while ago a colleague at work (I was in IT then) asked me how I had all those shiny tools - I had a reputation for seemingly having a tool for anything. My response was simple: I buy them, and I look after them - I also had a reputation for being "somewhat protective" over them.

EDIT: I personally prefer a hard tool box with dividers and trays - and arrange things carefully (helps protect your meter from the hacksaw). If you are packing up and there's a bit more room than there should be, it can be the difference between leaving something behind and remembering that you left it on top of a ceiling tile ... It's a personal preference thing though - I know others prefer a soft tote bag and just ---- everything in there.

Mark anything you buy with a dab or spray of coloured paint (in a location where it won't get worn away in use) so that you can identify your tools.
Good advice. Also consider investing in an engraving tool and put your name on them - I have a mate who was able to recover a whole bag of stolen tools from that, and a bit of bluffing to the second hand goods shop owner about the intentions of his mates in the van outside ;)
 

telectrix

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Mentor
Arms
Esteemed
Don’t go buying all expensive stuff straight away. You’ll only lose it or have it nicked.

On the other hand, you might get lucky and find an Estwing hammer or good screwdriver in an attic or under a floor lost by a previous worker.

A scutch chisel, @telectrix ? Last time I used or even saw one of those was 1996
so what do you use for chasing? i even got a beast of a SDS scutch chisel. no brick can withstand that in a 110V makita.
 
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