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M

MAD SPARK

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Dont know if anyones ever seen one of those fans with a downlight built in to it........??.. I cant find a link to one of the web.

Anyway. It has a transformer for the light and then the fan just gets connected seperatly 230V....

Does the fan need to have a fan isolator? It will be on its own independant switch on a simple on/off and the light incorporated in it will come on with the rest of the downlights.

Hope someone can help.

Cheers:)
 
E

electrotec

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #2
Theres been changes to bathroom areas in the 17th edition i am sure you need to fit an isolator anyway as per the 16th but if its in the new zone 1 it may have to be RCD protected as well. hope this helps
 
D

DonaldJ

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #3
Why have the fan on a separate switch? Why not get one with an over-run timer and have it come on with the lights. that way, when someone takes a shower there's no risk of them not using the fan.
 
S

Spudmiester

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #4
The fan isolator is for isolation for maintainance purposes, not for general on/off switching.

It should be three pole, to break the line, switched line, and neutral.

I used to fit them in the loft next to the fan, or if there was no loft space, above the bathroom door on the outside.
 
M

MAD SPARK

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #5
You cant get them with a run over timer......not those fans anyway.

Is it still necessary for an isolator?

I dont want them coming on with the lights its well annoying. Getting up in the middle of the night, turn the lights on and the fan comes on - not really my thing.

I know it is ok to have it on it's own switch because i've seen it done in new builds - also i have never seen fan isolators in new builds if the fans are on there own switch???...have things changed?
 
R

Ross Trician

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #6
My understanding of it is that to comply with the 17th it needs to be protected by RCD.
also there is only a need for an "isolation switch" if there is no window in the room it is being fitted.

hope this helps.
 
M

MAD SPARK

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #7
Thats brilliant, Thankyou

It will be RCD protected anyway because the switch wires etc in the rest of the circuit are buried in the wall at less than 50mm
 
C

Cirrus

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #8
Also, switching the fan on with the lights ain't too useful at this time of the year when it is so light at night / in morning and lights may not be needed.
 
D

DonaldJ

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #9
Also, switching the fan on with the lights ain't too useful at this time of the year when it is so light at night / in morning and lights may not be needed.
Good point although I'm picturing my downstairs shower room with no windows and a need for a light on every visit.

Good point re going the bog too. Again though, it's no issue in a downstairs shower room where there is no noise intrusion into the bedrooms.

For some reason I had a picture of my own house in my head!
 
S

Spudmiester

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #10
My understanding of it is that to comply with the 17th it needs to be protected by RCD.
also there is only a need for an "isolation switch" if there is no window in the room it is being fitted.

hope this helps.

Just curious, and not having a dig at anyone, but what does having a window/no window in the room have to do with fan isolators?
 
M

MAD SPARK

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #11
Maybe something do with the fact that you can still have light in there with the fan isolated maybe?...i deno just a guess
 
S

Shakey

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #12
Theres been changes to bathroom areas in the 17th edition i am sure you need to fit an isolator anyway as per the 16th but if its in the new zone 1 it may have to be RCD protected as well. hope this helps
There is no 'new zone 1'

Zones 0,1 & 2 are the same, just zone 3 has gone

and the requirement for all circuits in the bathroom to be an RCD is irellevant to zones
 
M

MAD SPARK

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #14
Yeah thats it.

I've asked this question elsewhere on the web and there seems to be so many different answers. Some say yes you definetly have to and others say only if it has no window and some say it needs a switched fused spur - it also says this in the instructions.???????????

HELP....i dont know which answer is right.. It would be better if i need no isolator at all then i can just go ahead as i wanted.

if someone can shed some light on this with some form of regulation or something it would be great.:eek:

also the lights are also wired in twin and earth shall i put a small junction box on and wire the fan and the transformer in flex?
 
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R

Roger

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #15
Hi there,

Does a bathroom fan have to have a triple pole isolator ? does it have to be outside the room ? House I was at today had no means of isolating the Fan so when testing i could not do bathroom lights as extractor was buried in wall and not easy to access and break wires to isolate.I guess I could remove wires from lights and kill it that way.I have to test lighting circuit so I have to kill fan, otherwise motor winding will give strange readings with insulation resistance.
What is the requirement for a fan ?,is it required by part P to be isolated ? the bathroom only has a skylight no window for info.
Thanks,
 
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