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Discuss best way to joinn cables in cu change ? in the Industrial Electrician Talk area at ElectriciansForums.net

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petewan

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I'm changing a cu, and some of the cables may be a bit short to connect to the new cu.
can any one advise me on the best way to connect and extend these cables.
I would grateful for any help.
Yours Pete.
 
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Paul_Rawlinson

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  • #2
I normally crimp them, if possible inside the new CU if not then in a 2gang Patress box with blanking plate on for neatness.have done it inside big trunking in the past aswell, looks fairly neat when done, well as neat as trunking can look in a house
 
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petewan

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #3
Thanks paul, i was thinking crimps
 
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uksel

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  • #4
can you fit a junction box in above the new CU (where the existing cables surface)

then run singles through some pvc conduit into the new CU
 
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WarrenG

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  • #5
I know it may seem a bit too obvious, but can you move the new CU to a better position i.e. higher or lower, further left or right?

If not as said crimps or JB.
 
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petewan

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #6
No Warren, cables coming in from top and bottom, all very short
 

jeremy

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Mentor
Arms
i would normally advocate crimps but have

Lets start again. I have started using spring operated push fit connectors. inexpensive and very quick. Work out about the same as crimps and a lot more definite when using them. Interested to hear others experiences
 
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jeremy

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Arms
I wouldn't know what to do with a link if it came up and smacked me in the face!! Not very computer literate! But I think the brand is Hellerman Tryon. If not they were reviewed in prof elec last month. If still no joy they're in the van, I'll get them out for tomorrow. Crimps can also come in different qualities. I've had crimps so soft that you could do them with your teeth, not much good , but too hard is 5hit also. I've never had a prob with SWA branded crimps but that isn't an advert or an endorsement!!
 
... but your not supposed to crimp solid core are you? because after time the solid core will have expanded and reduced in size, eventually causing the crimp to become loose? so whats the alternative ?
 

jeremy

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I've never been told that face to face and in fact prof elec last month or the month before were reviewing crimps for solid cores. I see the theory but if I can't pull them apart when I join them then it's a solid connection. This subject has come up before and I would love some one from the crimping industry to answer it. Surely this can not be beyond the means for someone who runs a site like this one perhaps!?
 
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uksel

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #12
this may sound like the most extreme and time-consuming and difficult

but joint soldering and applying heatshrink

going on a comment above i think the idea of crimping single cores is a bit dubious, good call there.
 
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fog

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #13
hi interested in this thread, i have used and still do use IDEAL brand spring loaded connectors once cable is in cannot be removed they are insulated but can only be used for 2.5mm or smaller cable csa, good to use in the back of switch for lighting circuits , but make sure you have done testing first as cant get a reading to well insulated!
 
response to uksel, won't the solder eventually melt a tad with electricity causing heat? I heard in one situation that sum1 soildered sum machinary, aparatenly a big mistake because the soilder melted and caused it to burn out or sumit?....
 
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fanta

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #15
I was brought up to believe that crimping of solid cores is "bad practice".Surely an adaptable box with fixed base connectors of the correcting rating for the circuits involved should do the job fine. Obviously the correctly labelling should be fitted to the box cover which should be mounted in an accessable position.
 
I was brought up to believe that crimping of solid cores is "bad practice".Surely an adaptable box with fixed base connectors of the correcting rating for the circuits involved should do the job fine. Obviously the correctly labelling should be fitted to the box cover which should be mounted in an accessable position.
I have been told in the past, that over time the copper will fuse together with the crimp/lug.
 
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uksel

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  • #17
response to uksel, won't the solder eventually melt a tad with electricity causing heat? I heard in one situation that sum1 soildered sum machinary, aparatenly a big mistake because the soilder melted and caused it to burn out or sumit?....
Hi LukeScotty

I think it's reasonable to say that this would only happen in the most extreme of circumstances, ie. house fire.

the connection is initially soldered on to the supply cables armouring anyway, the amount of heat it would take for the solder to melt is fairly substantial and the connection would be open and only really subject to room temperature. the heat of the supply cable would be very minor as the cable is generally sized for it's use.
 
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12345aob

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  • #18
What would be the best way of joining 6mm?
 

jeremy

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Arms
at what point does solder melt. I have had the severe misfortune of working for my Brorther in law, plumber and I'll tell you when solder melts , it's FLICKING hot. not overcurrent hot , Flame hot! I can't see over current melting solder.,

What would be the best way of joining 6mm?
Whopping great yellow crimps and forearms the size of Ulster!!
 
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bert1964

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #21
I think this may be what Jeremy is on about HellermannTyton United Kingdom - HelaCon - HelaCon
 
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montybaber

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  • #23
agree that ideal word no crimping solid cores and adaptable box with din mount screw terminals inside

but its not ideal im afraid lol
 
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uksel

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  • #24
JB & DIN rail. that's an idea and a half - good shout there i think from monty
 
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Spudnik

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  • #25
Guilty of using crimps and still do when space is of a premium.

But, as suggested, suitable enclosure with din rail terminals is the way to go.
 
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montybaber

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #26
I have always stood fast on never crimping solid cables until very recently when i was in a position where it was unavoidable.

I remember thinking at the time about this forum and the various thoughts and I felt guilty doing it after making such a stance on here but I remember thinking to myself

'if you cant beat em join em (literally lol)'

I wont make a habit of it thats for certain but I suppose in certain circumstances I can now see why its unavoidable:)
 
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bert1964

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #27
how much do they cost?
I got a box of 2 way and a box of 3 way (100/box) £19 delivered from EBAY - work a treat. Obviously need a suitable enclosure.
 
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Stixicus

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  • #28
I've used some of those HelaCon Plus connectors recently and think they're really good, cost £8.99 for 100 of the 3-way ones . As far as I'm aware they can only be used on cables between 1mm and 2.5mm, but i've seen some similar-ish ones on Ebay made by "Wago" described as "lever connector block electric crimps" which will apparently take up to a 4mm stranded core.
 
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