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pc1966

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I believe BS 88-3 is the replacement for the withdrawn BS 1361 that cover the fuses originally used for domestic supply cut-outs, etc, but the details are not exactly the same.

BS 88-2 seems to be related to EN 60269-2 and offers a huge range of body styles in both “general purpose” protection (gG) and "motor protection" (gM) ratings, the sort of stuff you see in industrial fused-switches and similar equipment. I don't know the details of the other versions of BS 88 but it is an old standard (88th issued!) that has been updated many times as fuse designs have evolved.

Unfortunately it is simply too expensive to buy a copy of the standard(s) out of idle curiosity!
 

pc1966

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Looking at the small preview the IEC site offers, the sections are described as this:

IEC 60269 consists of the following parts, under the general title Low-voltage fuses:
  • Part 1: General requirements
  • Part 2: Supplementary requirements for fuses for use by authorized persons (fuses mainly for industrial application) – Examples of standardized systems of fuses A to I
  • Part 3: Supplementary requirements for fuses for use by unskilled persons (fuses mainly for household or similar application) – Examples of standardized systems of fuses A to F
  • Part 4: Supplementary requirements for fuse-links for the protection of semiconductor devices.
  • Part 5: Guidance for the application of low-voltage fuses
So the TL;DR answer is 88-2 = industrial, 88-3 = domestic, 88-4 = fast fuses (motor drives, etc)
 

pc1966

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It looks like there was a BS 88-6 that has been withdrawn and merged in to BS 88-2 now:

BS 88-6:1988

Cartridge fuses for voltages up to and including 1000 V a.c. and 1500 V d.c. Specification of supplementary requirements for fuses of compact dimensions for use in 240/415 V a.c. industrial and commercial electrical installations

Status : Superseded, Withdrawn Published : October 1988 Replaced By : BS 88-2:2007
 
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pc1966

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Same goes for BS 88-2.2 from this:

BS 88-2.2:1988

Cartridge fuses for voltages up to and including 1000 V a.c. and 1500 V d.c. Specification for fuses for use by authorized persons (mainly for industrial application). Additional requirements for fuses with fuse-links for bolted connections

Status : Withdrawn, Revised Published : October 1988 Replaced By : BS 88-2:2007
 

pc1966

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So from today's research it seems if you are designing for a fuse-supplied system you would be looking only at Tables B3 (industrial, Ryefield boards, etc) or B4 (domestic) in the OSG as "current" new products.

Though they still have the older tables for rewirable in B1 (which I would hope not to have to deal with!) and the older standards for fuses in tables B2 (industrial, I guess?) and B5 (domestic).

I also guess this explains the difference between the industrial sized fuses that are usually the same size for a big range of currents, and the domestic that often are different body sizes per rating to reduce the chance of incorrect replacements being used.
 
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I was searching for a book of standards to explain this but could only find little pieces.

That is a excellent explanation again and similar to the research I have been doing on these fuses.

My curiosity started when filling in an EIC and wondering the difference between BS 1361 & BS 88-3.

Then I wanted to know about what different capacities they has regarding to types and use.

But that's when it got confusing looking at the different types in the OSG Appendix B and trying to find out their uses and differences.

So just to recap your information :

88-2 = industrial,
88-3 = domestic,
88-4 = fast fuses (motor drives, etc)

Tables in OSG
B1 (rewirable)
B2 (industrial)
B3 (industrial)
B4 (domestic)
B5 (domestic)
 

pc1966

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My curiosity started when filling in an EIC and wondering the difference between BS 1361 & BS 88-3.
Without paying the eye-watering prices for copies of the standards, I just don't know. There was a useful summary table in this with both standard's Zs limits given:

Then I wanted to know about what different capacities they has regarding to types and use.

But that's when it got confusing looking at the different types in the OSG Appendix B and trying to find out their uses and differences.
The BS 1361 & BS 88-3 also don't need the same PFC capacity as industrial work might demand. I think they are in the 16.5kA for the "type 1" fuses, those from 5-45A seen in some fuse boxes till the 80s that a home owner might change, and 33kA for the "type 2" range from 60-100A for cut-outs that one would hope the home owner does not change!

One other difference I did notice is the older standard would have 15, 30, 60A, and the new one 16, 32, 63A like MCBs.

Where as the industrial BS88-2 fuses are usually rated to interrupt at least 50kA, often 80kA or up to 200kA depending on size, etc., which might be useful if tapping power of a 3MW LV transformer...

So just to recap your information :

88-2 = industrial,
88-3 = domestic,
88-4 = fast fuses (motor drives, etc)

Tables in OSG
B1 (rewirable)
B2 (industrial)
B3 (industrial)
B4 (domestic)
B5 (domestic)
That is how I now understand it to be, with the B3/B4 being the one you would go to for any newer system or design work.
 

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