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P

pushrod

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Was doing a past paper and there was a question which i got wrong - along the lines of "an isolator is designed to turn something off under which conditions"
a)full load
b)short circuit
c) no load
d) overload

What is an isolator exactly and how is it different to a switch? :eek:
 
C

Chappers

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #2
I may get corrected here, but as far as I recall, an isolator fulfills a minimum distance between contacts inside the switch when in the open (disconnected/isolated) position. For the question you got wrong, I think the answer is 'under full load'.
 
an isolator works under no load conditions and should not be used for switching so therefore your answer would be c ;)
 
P

pushrod

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #4
I may get corrected here, but as far as I recall, an isolator fulfills a minimum distance between contacts inside the switch when in the open (disconnected/isolated) position. For the question you got wrong, I think the answer is 'under full load'.
Thanks chappers, i thought that too, but "well done Flukey" the answer was no load.

Anyone else with explanations of the difference between an isolator and a switch or is Chappers' one the only difference?
 
P

pushrod

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #5
Thanks chappers, i thought that too, but "well done Flukey" the answer was no load.

Anyone else with explanations of the difference between an isolator and a switch or is Chappers' one the only difference?
96 views and not too many responses. Anyway have been doing a bit of reading and for anyone who is interested - isolators (sometimes called disconnectors) are designed to completely isolate the whole instalation to allow you to work on it and will usually be positioned at the origin of the installation. They will switch L and N (with single phase) and brown, black and grey with 3 phase and neutral as well if a TT system. They will also usually be capable of being locked off as well, especially if in a remote location.

shame i can't give myself thanks :D
 
K

kung

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #6
96 views and not too many responses. Anyway have been doing a bit of reading and for anyone who is interested - isolators (sometimes called disconnectors) are designed to completely isolate the whole instalation to allow you to work on it and will usually be positioned at the origin of the installation. They will switch L and N (with single phase) and brown, black and grey with 3 phase and neutral as well if a TT system. They will also usually be capable of being locked off as well, especially if in a remote location.

shame i can't give myself thanks :D
Hence safe isolation !
 
hi pushrod,
look under definitions in the big red book. it will tell you all you need to know regarding switches and isolators ;)
 
P

pushrod

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #8
Cheers Kung!

hi pushrod,
look under definitions in the big red book. it will tell you all you need to know regarding switches and isolators ;)
Being on relatively limited funds haven't as yet invested in the ridiculously expensive BRB - got to sell a few more things on ebay first to raise the cash :D
 
if you are training as an electrician you will most probably have one included in your third years college fees
 
P

pushrod

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #10
if you are training as an electrician you will most probably have one included in your third years college fees
Am in my first year at the moment and have asked them about this and they are still discussing what to provide next year so unless i find a real bargain will probably hang fire 'til next year.
 
S

Steve D

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #11
An isolator is definately an off-load device.
 
J

johnnyb

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #13
Get the BRB and the onsite guide is very helpful and things in the onsite you can relate to quicker.
 
P

pushrod

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #14
:D just as well i started this thread - a question came up on isolators in my exam today :D
 
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