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Discuss Can connection plate be replaced by plug socket in the Electrical Forum area at ElectriciansForums.net

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Hi,

I’ve been living in a “new built” house for the last five years and the time to replace some of the built-in appliances has come.

My dishwasher and washing mashine are connected to the grid via connection plates similar to those, although I’m not aware of their exact technical parameters -

12099B60-9F0F-4EB9-A353-98ABB24C9640.png

The wires from those connection plates then go into something like this kitchen multi gang switch -

0CE5C54F-44E9-47E5-860B-DB42CBAE85BD.png

My question is if it would be a good idea, in terms of safety mainly, to replace the connection plates with plug sockets? The connection plate from the link has a 25A fuse, while plug sockets come with 13A. Would this be a problem?

If replacement is possible, would it be better to use one with or without switch?

I haven’t checked the oven, but I assume the same approach has been adopted there. Is the above replacement applicable there too?

P.S. The connection plates are located behind the appliances, which are under kitchen top, but not directly under the sink.
 
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Taylortwocities

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Arms
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Advent Win
Why do you want to do this? It’s fine as it is.


Other thoughts:
25A fuse??? Is that in the consumer unit?

As above. Show us a photo of the actual kitchen grid switch.

Personally, I hate sockets being located behind appliances. Think what happens if a fuse blows that powers a washing machine. Those things are heavy enough, but the fuse will go leaving you to pull out a washing machine plus a full load of wet washing and a gallon or three of water.
 

telectrix

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Mentor
Arms
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also, there might not be enough space behind appliances for the extra projection of a plug and socket.
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #5
The grid switch has fuses (13A for dishwasher, haven’t checked the oven) and switches
2880DCF8-29B1-4EB4-A646-E0BFA995EBC0.jpeg

The idea behind replacing connection plates with plug sockets is not to have to cut the plug of the new appliance in order to connect it to the grid, as my understanding is that this will void the warranty.

Also any future replacements might happen a bit more easy in theory.

I think there would be enough space to fit a plug socket and potentially a one that is IP66.

The 25A comes from my Internet searches. The connection plate pictured in my previous post is a 25A one - Deta 25A 1 Gang Connection Plate. I don’t know if my current ones are 25A, but my Internet searches show that most connection plates are 20A or 25A. I suggest that any new appliance that I buy would be fused at the plug at 13A?
 

Taylortwocities

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Arms
Esteemed
Advent Win
Agreed. It will not void the warranty.
If you introduce a fused plug onto the cable, you will then have two 13A fuses in series:
One in the plug and one in the grid switch. That is BAD design. You should not have two fuses of the same value protecting the same device. You should have a higher value at the supply end and a smaller one protecting the load. The only way you could achieve that is to strap out the fuse in the grid switch. But that is a totally pointless exercise!!’
It’s all find as it is. New appliance, chop the plug off and hard wire it in as it is now.

Don’t get confused about the 25A reference. That is NOT a fuse of any sort. The 25A is just the maximum current that the item can handle before it melts.

Similarly, leave the oven as it is.

In fact, leave everything as it is. Put a chair in the garden, pour yourself a beer, read the paper. That would be a better use of your time.
 

Midwest

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Arms
Esteemed
Wish I’d kept a link on here to my research about cutting off moulded plug (tops ☺).

@qPaxxx as chaps have said, cutting off manufacturers moulded plugs should not void any warranty. However, from my research there are some manufacturers who think it does.

I recall when stipulating that if their supply lead and or plug was damaged, only a replacement lead from them should be used. Their lead plugged into the appliance.

Not many but worth double checking.
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #9
Thank you very much for your advice.

I will adhere to it and not undertake any changes. I’ve spoken to AO customer service and they assured me the guarantee will be void, but nevertheless I prefer it void than introducing dodgy practices in my house (in terms of electricity of course:))

Thank you very much again:)

Edit:
Actually are there any un-fused plug sockets that can replace the connection plate? Or this would BAD idea as well?
 
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