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evo666

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I have been asked to sort out a few bits where a wall has been removed in a flat.

I have not really worked with either conduit or pyro before, am I right in thinking the CPC is the conduit/pyro outer sleve??

I am not sure how I would do the R1/R2 readings when there is no earth wires either at the socket or in the CPU.

Also, there is no equipotential bonding in the flat (they are 42 ys old). Would I need to add it?

Dodge
 
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T

TonyM58

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  • #2
Evo,

yeah the copper outer sheath of the pyro is normally connected as the CPC

We sometimes use an earth pot on 2 core pyro, this screw onto the copper sheath and has got an earth wire sticking out of it.

If not it is earthed through the gland as it coneects into the enclosure.

Exactly the same as if you were using steel conduit.

So if it was coming into a metal pattress (say for a socket outlet) then R1 + R2 is phase to the metal frame of the pattress. Make sure you get exposed metal - I have seen people complaining about the R1+R2 value when they are connected onto paint!!!

The equipotential bonding :- if the pipework is copper, then you need to add it. If the pipework was plastic with just an incoming copper then you dont need to.
 

ian.settle1

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Evo
Make sure that when the wall is removed that any conduit on it still continuity throughout. Better still if rewiring run cpc in conduit instead off relying on it for earth.
 
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evo666

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  • #4
Thanks alot for that guys

Big help :)
 
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markthespark

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  • #6
Pyro is MICC cable, pyro=fire MICC is a fire rated cable, and there is a company called pyro who manufactures MICC cable.
 
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EasyFox

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  • #8
And if you are at college now I think they tend to call it MIMS.
 
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TonyM58

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  • #9
Ian's correct

Pyro is the shortned trade name of Pyrotenax
 
feel a bit of tension here, people call all things different names. Anyways i still dont know what they stand for micc , mims

regards luke
 

ian.settle1

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MICC - Mineral Insulated Copper Cable

MIMS - Mineral Insulated Metal Sheathed

:p
 
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evo666

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  • #13
Nice to see I started a good thread :)
 
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megaman83

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  • #14
thats right easyfox i remember that from my tech days. MIMS mineral isulated metal sheathed
 
W

wattsup

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  • #15
Mi is protected, it cannot be none-earthed.
I saw a prog on telly recently where a guy used haystacks to build walls ...(grand designs I think) he used pyro ~(micc) and mistakely thought pyro cannot overload, pyro is the worst kind you can use. Pyro will get red-hot. Pyro, micc is used for protection in the event of fire, not before.

In effect pyro will still work under extreme temps, that's why it is used.

The guy whom wired his house through pyro has made a mistake and wasted tons of money. As many times he has read the rules wrong

A little knowledge is dangerous and expensive, no one pointed out the fact in the program. Mi or pyro is after the fact, not before.

He may as well wired in fp200, more or less the same and much cheaper. He mistakenly thinks pyro will protect his property, no it won't. In actual fact it is worst than pvc. Granted if nothing goes wrong his wiring should be ok for many years, but no better than pvc assumming protected correctly
 
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Mi is protected, it cannot be none-earthed.
I saw a prog on telly recently where a guy used haystacks to build walls ...(grand designs I think) he used pyro ~(micc) and mistakely thought pyro cannot overload, pyro is the worst kind you can use. Pyro will get red-hot. Pyro, micc is used for protection in the event of fire, not before.

In effect pyro will still work under extreme temps, that's why it is used.

The guy whom wired his house through pyro has made a mistake and wasted tons of money. As many times he has read the rules wrong

A little knowledge is dangerous and expensive, no one pointed out the fact in the program. Mi or pyro is after the fact, not before.



He may as well wired in fp200, more or less the same and much cheaper. He mistakenly thinks pyro will protect his property, no it won't. In actual fact it is worst than pvc. Granted if nothing goes wrong his wiring should be ok for many years, but no better than pvc assumming protected correctly
Will the fuse not operate to prevent over heating/overloading? They often specify pyro for explosive atmospheres.
I've seen pvc insulated cables hot enough to not be able to hold.
 
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