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gazdkw82

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Nearly Everytime iv tried crimping I have really struggled and its really starting to frustrate me.

Today I was trying to crimp a ring crimp to a 2.5mm solid conductor for attaching to a piranha earth ring on a SWA gland. Tried 3 times and it just wasnt a good connection. Tried different positions on the crimp and still no good.

Is it something I'm doing? Is it my crimper? Is it the crimps? Really starting to get to me now as in reality it's not exactly a difficult thing to do
 
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Deleted member 26818

Most Crimpers seem to only crimp on one side of the jaw.
The other side seems to just shape the plastic insulation on the crimp.
I prefer the type that crimps on both sides of the jaw.image.jpgimage.jpgimage.jpg
 
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gazdkw82

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  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
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I looked at the jaw and tried it both ways. It looks identical from either side
 

telectrix

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i've had problems with some crimpers. found the knipex ones are the best. narrow jaws, so you can crimp each end separately.
KNIPEX 97 00 215 A Crimp Grip Pliers burnished 215 mm
50214
 

telectrix

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got mine from elex on a deal. £60. you get what you pay for.
 
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Deleted member 26818

Most ratchet crimpers have an adjustment, so you can increase the force they crimp with.
 
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Lucien Nunes

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trying to crimp a ring crimp to a 2.5mm solid conductor
Were the crimp terminals designed and approved for solid-core cables? Is the die set in the tool matched to them?

For 'DIY car audio' grade connections, any blue terminal in the middle hole of any die set will do for any 2.5mm cable. But to get a proper termination that you can trust for proper work, you need a terminal made to a known specification, and the correct die set specified by the manufacturer. For example, I use TE's PIDG series, Duraseal, JST and Klauke, all of which have different die sets, and not all of which are suitable for solid-core.

Crimping is deceptively simple, but at the business end it's quite a sophisticated process of forming a cold weld between the wire and the terminal, not just squashing it shut, yet without weakening either part. Invest some time studying the data sheets from major manufacturers such as Tyco, AMP and JST; dismantle different brands and types of terminal, crimp some to a variety of cable types with different dies and then hacksaw through the middle and see what they look like, and the differences and subtleties will all start to be revealed. Then, when you want to put a ring on a 2.5mm cable, you will know which parts to trust and which tool to put them on with.

If that sounds like a lot of effort, don't forget that making connections is one of the main skills of being an electrician and worth a year of concentrated study and practice in its own right.
 
B

Bobster

Solid core cables from my experience and looking through data sheets, require uninsulated crimp connectors, and an indent type crimping tool.

The coloured, common crimps are only really suitable for stranded conductors.
 

davesparks

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i've had problems with some crimpers. found the knipex ones are the best. narrow jaws, so you can crimp each end separately.
KNIPEX 97 00 215 A Crimp Grip Pliers burnished 215 mm
View attachment 50214
I've got a set of these too, I've found them a lot easier to use. The arthritis in my hands make the normal type painful to use for some reason.
 

telectrix

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on mine i cut off the useless sliding selector. found it was sometimes damaging the crimps. but they are a delight to use. think it's because you get more squash for the effort put in squeezing. if that makes sense.
 

davesparks

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on mine i cut off the useless sliding selector. found it was sometimes damaging the crimps. but they are a delight to use. think it's because you get more squash for the effort put in squeezing. if that makes sense.
I find the sliding selector useful, it helps line up ring crimps in exactly the right place. But then I almost exclusively use it for ring crimps and almost never use butt connectors.
 
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