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B

beanzntoast

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Hi all,just abit of advice please a theoretical question really,if either of you went to a customer & they wanted all their socket height positions correcting to the current regulations( i.e min 450mm).without changing the whole wiring on the ring in order to reach the new positions what other options are available out there,Is crimping with heat shrink a prefferred way of extending the wires if so is this common practice to use the crimps on a solid conductors (not the stranded variety) because i heard you cannot (i've tried checking this in the ''very exciting to read '' BS 7671 :2008 :confused: but because i'm new to the book i can't find anything about this)or is it better to do it another way.A simple question to most of you but any advice would be appreiciated

cheers jason
 
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i was told not to crimp solids but we all do i dont think its a reg
someone will pipe up and put us right
in theory and joints should be accessable
 
B

beanzntoast

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #3
Don't know if i've understood it correct but in the bible regulation 526.3 ,,every connection should be made accessable except for the following blah blah blah & a joint made by welding,soldering,brazing or appropriate compression tool,wouldn't crimping come under the last bit,forgive my misunderstanding if i'm wrong
jason
 

Des 56

-
Arms
Esteemed
A crimped joint is a permanent connection and does not require to be accessable
Heat shrink re instates the required insulation
If the crimp is for solid cores,as long as it is carried out coorrectly then it is ok

The new regs do not requirethe sockets to be at such and such an heigith
Building regulations may require this for new or refurbished installations
Rewires or additions should make the compliance no worse,that is all
 
A

acat

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #5
Agree with the above however if you need to crimp buy a proper crimper £20.00 mark and not the toys you see for Mr DIY.

Chris
 
E

ezzzekiel

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #6
just to add, a cheap pair of crimps are worth keeping too find that the ratchet crimps are the best but if youre crimping 1.0mm then the ratchets dont compress far enough
 
S

Spudnik

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #7
just to add, a cheap pair of crimps are worth keeping too find that the ratchet crimps are the best but if youre crimping 1.0mm then the ratchets dont compress far enough
Handy tip, bur arent the ratchet ones adjustable for crimp pressure?
 

scotsparky

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Arms
I was on the understanding only ratchet crimpers were allowed as the with older type you cannot garentee the crimp pressure as it varys from man to man (or woman)
 
M

mikex79

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #9
Hi, Can anyone advice me
I have to replace a CU and all twin and earth cables are too short so I have to extend them and I want to use through crimps just about 30cm before the CU and enclose all the connections in 70mm x 55mm PVC trunking,
would that be alright and enough?
what about if I protect every connection with heat-shrinking sleeving shall I sleve every crimp or just sleeve every cable (3 crimps sleeved together) or do I really need to heatshrink sleeve them if they gonna be in the trunking which make them accessible for inspection
I will probably show this job in the nearest future for the NIC EIC or Elecsa assessor so I want to have it done propelly.
Also water main bnonding conductor is too short, would a crimp on it be acceptable?
any advice would be much appreciated
 
D

Deleted member 9648

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #10
Hi all,just abit of advice please a theoretical question really,if either of you went to a customer & they wanted all their socket height positions correcting to the current regulations( i.e min 450mm).without changing the whole wiring on the ring in order to reach the new positions what other options are available out there,Is crimping with heat shrink a prefferred way of extending the wires if so is this common practice to use the crimps on a solid conductors (not the stranded variety) because i heard you cannot (i've tried checking this in the ''very exciting to read '' BS 7671 :2008 :confused: but because i'm new to the book i can't find anything about this)or is it better to do it another way.A simple question to most of you but any advice would be appreiciated

cheers jason
If you are going to extend the cables at every socket in the house that is an awful lot of joints and I would really be concernerned about that.....any joint, no matter how well done is a potential weak point and that many inaccessible and plastered in...????....future problems guaranteed IMHO..........If they are determined to raise all the sockets I would advise rewiring.
 
J

JUD

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #11
From "Kitchen Fitting For Dummies".....


  1. Take the wires to be joined and twist them together
  2. Apply a generous amount of cheap insulation tape
  3. Shove back into wall and plaster
:eek: :D :D

Only kidding.

I'm with wirepuller, it may be just as quick to rewire when you think how many joints you're gonna have.
 
A

Adam W

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #12
If the joint were in trunking I wouldn't bother heatshrinking because it's accessible, but in the wall it would be better to heatshrink the cable (in reality I'd probably just use tape); in both cases I would stagger the joints so they're not both together.

For the record I wouldn't be happy crimping cables to every socket just so the heights can be moved to look like they were wired to current regs, I'd either push for the ring to be rewired or replace the socket front with a blank plate (possibly just a single) to allow for inspection, then see if the customer still wants them moved. That said this thread was started over a year ago so not sure if any advice is still needed.
 
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