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I have just wired a converted toilet, did my first fix last week, went back today to do 2nd fix. When the plasterer has been in and boarded the room, a screw I assume, has hit the wiring. The extended ring went from a double socket to a 5A FCU for the lights and a 13A FCU for the electric radiator before connecting back to the ring main. The cable I've identified as being damaged is the longest run back to the original double socket which connected up to extend the ring.

I know you can only spur one outlet from an existing socket, any advice on how I can repair or make it functional without tripping the MCB or RCD main switch without tearing the freshly plastered walls and ceiling apart to find the precise point of damage? I have a few ideas but wonder what others would do.
 
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Pete999

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I have just wired a converted toilet, did my first fix last week, went back today to do 2nd fix. When the plasterer has been in and boarded the room, a screw I assume, has hit the wiring. The extended ring went from a double socket to a 5A FCU for the lights and a 13A FCU for the electric radiator before connecting back to the ring main. The cable I've identified as being damaged is the longest run back to the original double socket which connected up to extend the ring.

I know you can only spur one outlet from an existing socket, any advice on how I can repair or make it functional without tripping the MCB or RCD main switch without tearing the freshly plastered walls and ceiling apart to find the precise point of damage? I have a few ideas but wonder what others would do.
Rejoin the RFC where you broke into it and fit an FCU to feed the lights ans extension. sorry forgot about the heater, my suggestion is not really viable with the heater in the mix. Dohh
 

Wilko

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Hi - as has been said - find and repair the fault. Or the the damaged section needs to be deleted. Then it can be replaced or perhaps the RFC reconfigured as radial circuits with reduced overload protection.
 

SparkyChick

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If it's stud work, there can only be so many place where screws may have hit the cabling (I'm assuming the cables pass through the studwork). Since you installed the cabling, you will know the run.

If the screw is linking say Line and Earth, fully isolate the damaged cable and carry out a continuity test between the linked conductors, then using the R1+R2 per m values in Guidance Note 3, you may be able to get a rough indication of how far along the cable the damage is.

Using your knowledge of the run and the length you get from the test above, you may be able to pin it down to an area to minimise any potential damage.
 

Baddegg

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Speak to the customer, explain what’s happened as per the other advise I’d be finding the fault and if that means damage to the new ceiling that’s the way it is, can you not get at it from above?
 
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Speak to the customer, explain what’s happened as per the other advise I’d be finding the fault and if that means damage to the new ceiling that’s the way it is, can you not get at it from above?
The room is an old porch which has been boarded out and has a flat roof. I didn't note what the external wall was as I might be able to access the wiring that way...
Post automatically merged:

If it's stud work, there can only be so many place where screws may have hit the cabling (I'm assuming the cables pass through the studwork). Since you installed the cabling, you will know the run.

If the screw is linking say Line and Earth, fully isolate the damaged cable and carry out a continuity test between the linked conductors, then using the R1+R2 per m values in Guidance Note 3, you may be able to get a rough indication of how far along the cable the damage is.

Using your knowledge of the run and the length you get from the test above, you may be able to pin it down to an area to minimise any potential damage.
Yeah it's all studwork
 

Andy78

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Plaster gets disturbed to repair and replace the cable. Simple as that. Person at fault pays for reinstatement of the plasterboard.
 
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Hi - as has been said - find and repair the fault. Or the the damaged section needs to be deleted. Then it can be replaced or perhaps the RFC reconfigured as radial circuits with reduced overload protection.
I was thinking of deleting the cable and reconfiguring or running a new length but this time going under the floor to minimise damage to the walls and ceiling.
 

Matthewd29

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I was thinking of deleting the cable and reconfiguring or running a new length but this time going under the floor to minimise damage to the walls and ceiling.
Probably the best option. If it's not possible, whoever damaged the cable is liable to be billed for making good after replacing cable.
 
Plaster gets disturbed to repair and replace the cable. Simple as that. Person at fault pays for reinstatement of the plasterboard.
And may learn an expensive but valuable lesson!

So many times other trades have come, in done their bit, got payed and done one, leaving us sparks only to find damaged cable etc on our return to second fix!

Pee's me off when a dodgy plasterer comes in gets paid loads, does half a day, an bunks off to the pub spending his spoils while we are working long hours to make ends meet. Don't get me wrong plastering can be hard work and a good job takes some skill (I've done a bit myself), but its not rocket science. The majority (not all) in my experience don't give a ---- about any other person on sight or their respective work.

"Just get in, slap it on, sod the mess, get down the bookies and pub asap". I've heard this, or versions of it many times.
 
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Probably the best option. If it's not possible, whoever damaged the cable is liable to be billed for making good after replacing cable.
I think this is the best option. Cutting the floor is going to be less destructive than chasing through the walls again. I knew yesterday was too smooth a day for second fixing. There had to be something go wrong and this was it. Another thought is cutting the damaged cable at the first FCU and linking the ring from there and having the heater on a spur...
 
Not exactly rinsing it are they . £140 a day up my end .
That'll most likely be cash in hand, and if they are declaring it you don't generally get much done per day. I do know a couple of good plasterers who do charge a fair rate for a decent job but in my experience these are few and far between. I also have a couple of friends who are plasterers and they are always the first in the pub and carrying wads of cash on them. :smile: But it is a tough job so if they can earn good money good luck to them!

My point was more focused on, in my experience the majority of plasterers don't give a stuff about the other trades that follow them.
 

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