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Discuss DIY Help - Joining 2 halves of a cut power cord in the DIY Electrical Forum area at ElectriciansForums.net

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Hello -

I bought a corded hedge trimmer today and started using it. In about 5 minutes I had managed to chop through the cable! Rookie error. Here are the cut cable ends (I am in the UK btw)


So I need to repair the cable. Having googled around, I could solder the wires together, but I don't much fancy my soldering skills - so I was thinking that it would be a lot easier instead if I could buy a 1 gang extension cable, remove both the plug and the socket end and then wire the plug to one end of my cut cable, and the socket to the other end and just plug them together.

Any reason this won't work or any reason I shouldn't do this? What is the best way to do this?

Cheers.
 
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PEG

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Mentor
Arms
Esteemed
Hi,I would repair that,with a new lead.
I do not know how many times,you have used a powered hedge cutter,but your first ever cord repair,does not need to be this one:)
 
D

Deleted member 26818

The connector types shown in the previous posts are not really suitable, as they easily pull apart.
You need a Flymo type connector:
B&Q 10A 2 Pin plug & socket | DIY at B&Q - https://www.diy.com/departments/b-q-10a-2-pin-plug-socket/171009_BQ.prd?utm_source=google_cpc&utm_medium=shopping&utm_campaign=PX_GSC_EPHC_+_Generic&ppc_type=shopping&ds_kids=92700041283649913&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIwr-zn4HY4AIVbRHTCh15nQzREAQYAyABEgI2F_D_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds
Also the connector, should not be in a position in the lead where it will be dragging on the ground through wet grass.
You need to shorten the lead at the trimmer end to about 12 - 18 inches.
I would also suggest you consider purchasing an RCD plug:
RCD Plug - https://www.toolstation.com/rcd-plug/p99372
Having an RCD in your consumer unit is all well and good, as long as you test it regularly.
Having an RCD plug gives you the opportunity to test the RCD every time you use the trimmer.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

littlespark

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Arms
Esteemed
Advent Win
People keep suggesting having an RCD in circuit.
I think there is one already- owing to the fact that the OP is still here and not jiggling around on his back with a hedge trimmer in one hand and a severed flex in the other.
 

Andy78

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Mentor
Arms
Esteemed
People keep suggesting having an RCD in circuit.
I think there is one already- owing to the fact that the OP is still here and not jiggling around on his back with a hedge trimmer in one hand and a severed flex in the other.
Dunno. Seen a few cut flexes where the 3036 wire stayed intact and the human operative suffered no ill effect. One of them even picked up the flex to inspect the damage :eek: (dopey friend of the missus)
 

littlespark

-
Arms
Esteemed
Advent Win
My sister in law had a shock once from a grazed lawnmower cable. Hadn’t cut right through, but copper showing.
She had finished and was looping the flex round her hand to collect it up.

I told her to buy one of those RCD plug adaptors.
 
The connector types shown in the previous posts are not really suitable, as they easily pull apart.
You need a Flymo type connector:
B&Q 10A 2 Pin plug & socket | DIY at B&Q - https://www.diy.com/departments/b-q-10a-2-pin-plug-socket/171009_BQ.prd?utm_source=google_cpc&utm_medium=shopping&utm_campaign=PX_GSC_EPHC_+_Generic&ppc_type=shopping&ds_kids=92700041283649913&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIwr-zn4HY4AIVbRHTCh15nQzREAQYAyABEgI2F_D_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds
Also the connector, should not be in a position in the lead where it will be dragging on the ground through wet grass.
You need to shorten the lead at the trimmer end to about 12 - 18 inches.
I would also suggest you consider purchasing an RCD plug:
RCD Plug - https://www.toolstation.com/rcd-plug/p99372
Having an RCD in your consumer unit is all well and good, as long as you test it regularly.
Having an RCD plug gives you the opportunity to test the RCD every time you use the trimmer.
Completely unnecessary if there is a RCD in the CU already. It just means you have 2 to reset when there is a fault.

Also quite often testing the RCD in the plug will trip the main RCD as well.
 
How close to one end is it damaged? If only a few meters might be best to just make the lead a few meters shorter and 'hard wire' it in.
Alternatively one of the many 'in line' connectors readily available (IP44 minimum).
 
D

Deleted member 26818

Completely unnecessary if there is a RCD in the CU already. It just means you have 2 to reset when there is a fault.

Also quite often testing the RCD in the plug will trip the main RCD as well.
Yep, unnecessary, until you find the RCD in the CU has never been tested and is seized.
 
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