Discuss DIY lighting in garage in the New Member Introductions area at ElectriciansForums.net

Super_resin

EF Member
Messages
11
Location
Brighton
Hi,
I am not a qualified electrician, but have been asked to install downlights in a garage by a family friend.
There is currently a flouresent tube in there, which be used as the starting point for the series of lights.
I just want to know as a non qualified electrician I can carry out this work as a diyer in someone else’s house, as I am not changing the circuit? Or would this need to be signed off?
 

Murdoch

Regular EF Member
Messages
25,126
Location
Woking
Do you have any test equipment?
 

Strima

Electrician's Arms
Messages
3,522
Location
St Neots
Walk away, anything goes wrong you will be liable no matter how good a friend you have.
 

Murdoch

Regular EF Member
Messages
25,126
Location
Woking
There is currently a flouresent tube in there, which be used as the starting point for the series of lights.
as I am not changing the circuit? Or would this need to be signed off?
But you are changing the circuit ........ its not a like for like unit swap.
 

Spoon

Forum Mentor
Messages
7,166
Location
Lancashire
You will have to give them a Minor Work Certificate for the install.
As above, you are liable if anything goes wrong with the circuit, so if there is a fire due to the wiring then you pay for all the damages.
 

buzzlightyear

please let me back in to the prison cell.
Electrician's Arms
Messages
6,887
Location
star command
why do you think you can change the lighting in the garage .
if it was me your friend. I would say go on knock you self out .;)
 

GMES

Hairy and proud
Staff member
Admin
Messages
8,764
Location
Under the banana tree.
Hi super resin and welcome to the forum, as others are saying you will need to test and cert the work as you are altering the circuit , if it was a straight swap I would say crack on but with what you propose it needs doing right and you need to cover yourself.
 
OP
S

Super_resin

EF Member
Messages
11
Location
Brighton
This is not a change or new circuit as it is already there. I am just adding lights to the already wired circuit. It is a simple job, but I just want to know am I allowed to do this as a diyer?
 

Murdoch

Regular EF Member
Messages
25,126
Location
Woking
This is not a change or new circuit as it is already there. I am just adding lights to the already wired circuit. It is a simple job, but I just want to know am I allowed to do this as a diyer?
MATE: You are extending cables .......... and changing the load ....... its not a like for like swap

Are you charging your "friend"?
 
OP
S

Super_resin

EF Member
Messages
11
Location
Brighton
I have installed downlights many times and have the ability to do it.
I just want to know if he will need to get it tested/signed off or not. He is helping, just trying to help him out?
Thanks
 

buzzlightyear

please let me back in to the prison cell.
Electrician's Arms
Messages
6,887
Location
star command
I have installed downlights many times and have the ability to do it.
I just want to know if he will need to get it tested/signed off or not. He is helping, just trying to help him out
I will now give the f77king answer .considering you are not qualified. and many sparks are .you are doing some body out of work that is they are trained and insured.considering you are playing with fire .
would take engine out and strip it .and put it back!:mad:
 

Murdoch

Regular EF Member
Messages
25,126
Location
Woking
I have installed downlights many times and have the ability to do it.
I note you have answered my question about test equipment, so lets assume its no ..... so how on earth do you know ANYTHING you install is safe?

You don't
 

123

Electrician's Arms
Messages
1,662
Location
East Antrim, Northern Ireland
Having seen so often the appalling standard of some downlight installations, just because you have done it before means little. Doing it so it works is one thing, doing it correctly and testing that it is safe is entirely different.
 

Spoon

Forum Mentor
Messages
7,166
Location
Lancashire
This is not a change or new circuit as it is already there. I am just adding lights to the already wired circuit. It is a simple job, but I just want to know am I allowed to do this as a diyer?
See the posts #2 and #5. Your question has already been answered mate.
 
OP
S

Super_resin

EF Member
Messages
11
Location
Brighton
From April 2013 electrical work in a dwelling, or associated with its surroundings, is notifiable to a local building control body where the work includes:

• the installation of a new circuit, whether at low voltage (typically 230 V) or extra-low voltage); or
• the replacement of a consumer unit (fusebox); or
• any alteration or addition to an existing circuit in a special location*, whether at low voltage (typically 230 V) or extra-low voltage

*A special location is a room containing a bath or shower, swimming pool or a sauna heater.
 
OP
S

Super_resin

EF Member
Messages
11
Location
Brighton
From April 2014 you will also be able to employ a non-registered electrical installer who has appointed a registered third party certifier to carry out the required inspection and testing of the work both during and on completion.
 

Matthewd29

Regular EF Member
Messages
1,192
Location
Belfast
Are you competent enough to do this?Does your insurance cover you to do this work? Have you got the correct test equipment and are you going to issue a certificate? If yes then yes by all means do it if no then I wouldn't go near it
 
A

Adam W

Presumably this friend of yours has asked you to install the downlighters to save a few quid?

As others have said it isn't a question of getting the green light from someone on the internet to crack on, the problems come about if you get something wrong and your friend (or at worst the CPS) comes after you - since you know you're not qualified would you feel confident standing up in court and touting your idea of "DIY in someone else's house" being so different to working in their house for free, to working in their house for payment in kind, to working in their house for payment?

Do you think a court might consider that since you had done work for someone you are not related to, whether paid or otherwise, that you should be qualified to carry out that work and also to be accountable for it?

By the sound of it you should be consulting a solicitor to assess your liability rather than getting legal advice from an electrician on the internet; either that or save a few quid on solicitors' fees by getting an electrician to do the electrical work.
 

telectrix

Scouser and Proud.
Respected Member
Messages
60,287
Location
cheshire/staffordshire
a lot of negatives from respected members. the OP wants to know whether or not he can do it. the answer is yes, he can. caveat being that even if he is competent to carry out the work,does he realise that without test equipment, he can't be sure it's safe, and without PL insurance, can he pay for any damage caused if he gets it wrong. of course he can do it (legally) but at his own risk.
 
OP
S

Super_resin

EF Member
Messages
11
Location
Brighton
Thankyou telectrix.
I have never posted on a forum before as I have noticed there are many people who just spout off and don’t answer the question.
I have read all the regulations and it is very unclear as to what you can actually do in your own home. I am not an idiot and do various work anyway. I am just very interested into how people read into the regulations and what they mean.
Personally I feel that if I was doing this in my own home, regulations say that I can. I am just interested if this work was done in someone else’s house and who I should get to check it, if required.
Thanks
 

Murdoch

Regular EF Member
Messages
25,126
Location
Woking
^^ are you charging for this service?
 

Murdoch

Regular EF Member
Messages
25,126
Location
Woking
Thankyou telectrix.
I have never posted on a forum before as I have noticed there are many people who just spout off and don’t answer the question.
I have read all the regulations and it is very unclear as to what you can actually do in your own home. I am not an idiot and do various work anyway. I am just very interested into how people read into the regulations and what they mean.
Personally I feel that if I was doing this in my own home, regulations say that I can. I am just interested if this work was done in someone else’s house and who I should get to check it, if required.
Thanks
Like YOU.
 

westward10

In echoed steps I walk across an empty dream.
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
11,529
Location
Northamptonshire
Thankyou telectrix.
I have never posted on a forum before as I have noticed there are many people who just spout off and don’t answer the question.
I have read all the regulations and it is very unclear as to what you can actually do in your own home. I am not an idiot and do various work anyway. I am just very interested into how people read into the regulations and what they mean.
Personally I feel that if I was doing this in my own home, regulations say that I can. I am just interested if this work was done in someone else’s house and who I should get to check it, if required.
Thanks
Is there a room above the garage.
 

Murdoch

Regular EF Member
Messages
25,126
Location
Woking
Are you going to answer any of my questions ?
 

Andy78

Respected Member
Messages
8,393
Location
Kingston upon Hull
All alterations of circuits should be fully tested by a competent person and a certificate issued. This is regardless of any requirements or not to notify the work to building control.
 

mattg4321

Electrician's Arms
Messages
694
Location
South East
From April 2013 electrical work in a dwelling, or associated with its surroundings, is notifiable to a local building control body where the work includes:

• the installation of a new circuit, whether at low voltage (typically 230 V) or extra-low voltage); or
• the replacement of a consumer unit (fusebox); or
• any alteration or addition to an existing circuit in a special location*, whether at low voltage (typically 230 V) or extra-low voltage

*A special location is a room containing a bath or shower, swimming pool or a sauna heater.
Just because it isn't notifiable to building control, doesn't mean it doesn't require testing. ALL work however small requires testing.

What test equipment do you have?
 

Murdoch

Regular EF Member
Messages
25,126
Location
Woking
@Super_resin was so quick to have a pop at people not answering his questions but won’t answer ours

Matey .... you can’t have it both ways
 

Midwest

Electrician's Arms
Messages
11,174
Location
Oxfordshire
From April 2013 electrical work in a dwelling, or associated with its surroundings, is notifiable to a local building control body where the work includes:

• the installation of a new circuit, whether at low voltage (typically 230 V) or extra-low voltage); or
• the replacement of a consumer unit (fusebox); or
• any alteration or addition to an existing circuit in a special location*, whether at low voltage (typically 230 V) or extra-low voltage

*A special location is a room containing a bath or shower, swimming pool or a sauna heater.
Part P building regs, also state that electrical installations should be designed & installed in accordance with BS7671 (current addition being the 18th).

OP if you were working in your own house, I suspect your own house insurance would cover you? It may even cover you, for causing damage in someone else's house; you would need to enquire about the liability aspect, mind.

Course, as already said, don't tell anyone and just crack on (I take no liability for that statement :) ).

My new neighbour has asked me to do some work in his house. As I've quite the game (no longer have liability insurance, not in a scheme), I politely declined.

I do get the feeling, you won't be reading this post.
 

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