Discuss Do i need to be under NAPIT / NIC to sign off EICR? in the Electrical Testing & PAT Testing Forum area at ElectriciansForums.net

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Hi.. not posted on here much but im after a bit of advice.

I have recently qualified 18th edition (level 3 electrotechnical EAL)
Im looking into joining either NAPIT or NIC for the ease of contacting building control to sign jobs off. i then found out i will need the 2391 testing and inspection to carry out EICRs via them?

I have been looking around the internet and seen a few people saying i can self cert domestic EICRs without going through either of the 2 companies as long as i have the correct insurance. Is this true?

Could some one shed some light on this please

Thank you

Dom
 
loz2754

loz2754

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You can (and should) certify your own work as long as you're competent to do so (as in EIC, or Minor Works certs).

For an EICR, no notification or scheme membership is necessary. However, you may find people expect you to be a scheme member.

Building control notification is another matter entirely. It's technically the responsibility of the person ordering the work to notify Part P notifiable works, before the work even commences, and pay the local authority £100s for the service.
However, it's far cheaper and more convenient for the householder to use an electrician who is registered with one of the schemes that allow the registered user to notify building control through the scheme provider (NICEIC etc.), as it only costs £2 or £3 per notification.

It's against the law to not notify work that should be notified, but it's the householder's responsibility to do so.

Conclusion being, most householders will naturally prefer to use a registered electrician, as it's more convenient and a lot cheaper than notifying the council themselves.
 
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You can (and should) certify your own work as long as you're competent to do so (as in EIC, or Minor Works certs).

For an EICR, no notification or scheme membership is necessary. However, you may find people expect you to be a scheme member.

Building control notification is another matter entirely. It's technically the responsibility of the person ordering the work to notify Part P notifiable works, before the work even commences, and pay the local authority £100s for the service.
However, it's far cheaper and more convenient for the householder to use an electrician who is registered with one of the schemes that allow the registered user to notify building control through the scheme provider (NICEIC etc.), as it only costs £2 or £3 per notification.

It's against the law to not notify work that should be notified, but it's the householder's responsibility to do so.

Conclusion being, most householders will naturally prefer to use a registered electrician, as it's more convenient and a lot cheaper than notifying the council themselves.
Thank you for clearing that up. So as long as I am competent i can use software like easy cert to sign off my own EICR without any further paper work or notifying anyone?
 
timhoward

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The term "competent" is used in the H&S and Electricity at Work Regulations.
BS7671 uses the term "skilled person" - defined as having adequate education and practical skills appropriate to the nature of the work undertaken (as well as some other stuff about perceiving risks.)
This would come under scrutiny if you damage yourself, someone or something, or if after an inspection an accident occurs that your inspection missed or misjudged. The responsibility of putting your name to a document saying an installation is satisfactory (or otherwise) shouldn't be under estimated. If you believe you are skilled, then yes, you can proceed. I'd highly recommend public liability and professional indemnity insurances are held.

Where it does get a bit more fun is if your findings on an EICR require work that you can't complete without notifying Building Control, e.g. changing a consumer unit, providing a new circuit , or work in a special location like a bathroom. In these circumstances you are back to needing to be in a scheme. That said, it doesn't have to be you doing the remedial work.
 

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