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Dustydazzler

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Pretty much every new fan i seem to come across is just vented up into the loft space , i dont think i have ever come across a fan that is ducted properly to a sofit grill or vent tile yet
 
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LastManOnline

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Wow, watch out for brittle cables if that is polystyrene.
it can remove the plasticisers from the pvc leaving it brittle when flexed.
Strangely, it was, nt sticking and "leeching" the pvc like it normally does. Here is how it looked 30 min later. Clean as a whistle, no sign of any heat damage. Good advertisement for the heat dissapation ability of Hagar mcb,s. This afterall is an electric home (electric shower, hob, immersion etc)
 

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Simon47

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Was on a job the other week where a “builder” had plumbed the gas into the hot water pipe…..that caused some panic….
I bet.
I recall a while back an incident where the water and gas mains in the street got compromised - don't recall how. But the gas main filled with water and caused "quite a few problems" when it reached users' appliances.
After a quick search, it seems it's not a "very rare" event - I found videos from more than one gas distributor on "what we do if there's water in the gas mains". One mechanism to cause the problem seems to be a water pipe getting a leak, and that forming a high pressure jet which, together with particles from the surrounding soil, forms a cutting jet that then makes a hole in the gas pipe.
 
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pc1966

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Strangely, it was, nt sticking and "leeching" the pvc like it normally does. Here is how it looked 30 min later. Clean as a whistle, no sign of any heat damage. Good advertisement for the heat dissapation ability of Hagar mcb,s. This afterall is an electric home (electric shower, hob, immersion etc)
Is that a fuse and a MCB in series for the supply?
 
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pc1966

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Out today helping a friend with some non-electrical stuff. Someone had brought in their own TV and it must be the skankiest work I have personally seen so far. It had not one, but two, joints in the moulded cable adding some T&E (I think?) either to extent it or to repair some damage. Also they could not even find PVC tape to cover it, it looked like masking tape :(

Forgive my poor photography as I just missed the moulded 13A plug to the left of the lower photo.

TV-cable-top.jpg

TV-cable-bottom.jpg
 
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Simon47

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That's pretty tidy.
But speaking as someone who's installed a few network points over the years, it really pees me off when I've gone to great lengths to keep the network cabling separate from mains wiring - only to find the ****ing sparkies have gone and mixed there's in with mine 🤬
 
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Mikegh

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That's pretty tidy.
But speaking as someone who's installed a few network points over the years, it really pees me off when I've gone to great lengths to keep the network cabling separate from mains wiring - only to find the ****ing sparkies have gone and mixed there's in with mine 🤬
I've always found it the other way round tbh

Network and alarm guys piggybacking on the electrical installation and paralleling with mains cabling
 
SparkySy

SparkySy

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Been on a second fix today went to connect the outside lights up and found a dead short neutral to earth, though it may be the fitting but alas no it was the Plaster boarder using 3inch screws for 12mm boards!😡
IMG_20210824_1439445.jpg
Had to move half a bedroom to find the spot, then measured where it was above and used a magnet to find the screw and remove it. I had to get it out to get the old cable out and new one back in! I love plasterers at the moment as you can probably imagine!😠
 
ipf

ipf

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That's pretty tidy.
But speaking as someone who's installed a few network points over the years, it really pees me off when I've gone to great lengths to keep the network cabling separate from mains wiring - only to find the ****ing sparkies have gone and mixed there's in with mine 🤬
Can't say network 'engineers' work to anything like our regs, to tell the truth.
Admittedly, standards are falling badly all round but comparing some of the thrown in bunches of IT cables with mains installs is, in general, a bit of a joke.
 
freddo

freddo

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I've always found it the other way round tbh

Network and alarm guys piggybacking on the electrical installation and paralleling with mains cabling

Yep, we installed some steel conduit recently above an office ceiling for door access. The wiring in this office in installed to a very high standard and I intend to keep it that way. Steel conduit and trunking is used throughout the building, partly as the risk of fire and explosion is quite high, the nearby plant equipment operating at ridiculously high temperatures and pressures The door access was installed to a very poor standard, cables chucked over the ceiling grid, wires poked through gaps in walls where steel trunking passes through, mismatching accessories and surface boxes. They have run a load of network cables for IP cameras, I didn't want to look at how those were installed above the ceiling last time I was there.
dooro.jpg
 
westward10

westward10

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Yep, we installed some steel conduit recently above an office ceiling for door access. The wiring in this office in installed to a very high standard and I intend to keep it that way. Steel conduit and trunking is used throughout the building, partly as the risk of fire and explosion is quite high, the nearby plant equipment operating at ridiculously high temperatures and pressures The door access was installed to a very poor standard, cables chucked over the ceiling grid, wires poked through gaps in walls where steel trunking passes through, mismatching accessories and surface boxes. They have run a load of network cables for IP cameras, I didn't want to look at how those were installed above the ceiling last time I was there.
View attachment 89090
Funnily enough I rewired one of these in a school a couple of weeks ago. They had a run of 40 odd meters in 0.50 flex slung across the roof voids, crazy thing you can walk around the voids and like yours it is all steel trunking in the voids with a route direct from the board to where it needed to be, rewired in about two hours using the trunkings already in situ.
 
freddo

freddo

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Reminds me of another site, we tidied all the wiring up. Lashed in cabling was replaced with steel conduit, cables tied to overhead steel conduits were removed or installed inside the conduits. We removed the redundant circuits which left quite a large amount of space in trunkings and several 32 and 25mm conduits that spanned the room ended up empty. A tenant moved in and wiring was installed by cable tying it to the trunking and empty conduits. SMFH. I wish I could find photos of the existing conduit, a work of art. The conduit system must have been installed complete, starting at one corner. So carefully planned that there were no running couplers needed.
 
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Simon47

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I thought all network engineers worked to this sort of standard 🤣🤣🤣🤣
Some of us do, or did, I'm not in that line any more.
At one client, I got handed this by the sparkies (they gave the network cable to the apprentice to do, totally unsupervised, and with even less clue than he had supervision) :
AAF4FF5A-6FC8-4C9D-8506-A29B11788137_1_105_c.jpeg
And managed to unravel it all, work out which was which (badly or not marked at all), and eventually turned it into this. I normally put the panels at the top of the rack, but there were a few cables "a bit short" - while there was another that went all the way to the far end of the building and half way back 🤣
0DB34331-A1DC-44E6-86D0-C76440BA0142_1_105_c.jpeg
This was the back of the panels for the phones (in house at a previous job) - mix of proprietary digital, analogue, and ISDN-2
05602303-5FC4-4686-B4BF-D504A7902121_1_105_c.jpeg
Now let's see the other side of those patch panels when everything is connected! The test seems to be, it's all good if you can get the door to close...
Better without doors IMO. Front of the in-house panels above - and all the cables colour coded (green for phones, blue for serial, yellow for network) and all recorded in a database. Not long after I left, someone decided that was too hard, ditched the database, and used all black patch leads (and didn't even route them neatly) !
CD6E7FC4-0972-4630-90D4-C00DE80A280D_1_105_c.jpeg

With one client (a business centre), they had a right 'kin mess. We quoted to tidy it all up (we already did their IT), but the owner decided someone else was cheaper. To be fair, the other lot did a decent job, all nicely correct length patch cables, and all neatly cable tied together 😇 Yep it was nice and tidy. But I suspect that anyone with half a clue about structured cabling will be ahead of me as to the effect on being able to actually move anything 🤣

But yes, sometimes you can shut the doors ... almost (front side of the client job above). But all that does is keep the heat in.
2BCD0FE0-1523-4418-ADF1-475A7B06847C_1_105_c.jpeg
f'knows what it looks like now, I'm sure they'll have had some 'kin cowboy sparkies in to add data points since I was last involved.
We removed the redundant circuits which left quite a large amount of space in trunkings
Well there's one thing clients rarely want to pay for. It's a common problem to find that ducts etc are full - but no-one has a clue what's still in use and what can be ripped out. To do it safely usually means starting at the ends (i.e. where you know cables are terminated), and cutting them back as you go.
I suppose you could apply the Nakatomi Tower technique and then sort out what's not working 😆
At a previous job we had a client who was a science park. They'll have that problem soon, if they don't already. They went through a phase where the park management didn't care who ran private cables between offices using the site ducting - and kept no records.
A tenant moved in and wiring was installed by cable tying it to the trunking and empty conduits. SMFH. I wish I could find photos of the existing conduit, a work of art.
We once got a job where there was segregated trunking, conduit drops to each outlet, etc. But we were told we were explicitly not allowed to touch the trunking as they'd had BT in to install their cabling and they weren't prepared to risk any "finger pointing" in the event of problems. So we were using the drops in the walls, but cutting into the trunking to get the cables out above the ceiling and running them where we could. Clients eh !
 
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Mikegh

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Very good standard of work there

One thing that always puzzled me about data cables was multicompartment pvc trunking

It's functional but it's designed to parallel mains and data cabling which isn't really what you want to be doing

Prob no other option for most surface work
 

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