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Vortigern

Vortigern

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I am not sure you could get a shock through two plastic connectors, and some damp wood. But anyway looking at your electrics, if you are concerned about safety etc. I suggest you upgrade your fusebox to a modern one with RCD protection as soon as possible. As an aside did you have a wet floor and bare feet when experiencing these shocks? I also wonder, when the bath actually leaked on Thursday, did no one else get a shock from the taps? Is it only you that got a shock some three days later? Were you touching both taps?
 
Strima

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As alluded to by others there could be a more serious problem which was only highlighted when things became wet.

It appears you have no RCD protection, an RCD would have more than likely have tripped as soon as the fault occurred, not when your wife touched the taps.

Did your electrician do any further inspection and testing or did he/she go straight to the pipes and suggest bonding?
 
littlespark

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Plastic push fit connections are used widespread, We don’t link every bit of copper pipe nowadays.

the electrician that quoted to bond the pipes is having a go.

Unless he links every length of pipe every side of every fitting, which could, in the event of another fault, create live taps across the house!

upgrade your consumer unit, which would involve the EICR suggested, will pick up any nailed cables and would increase the safety of your installation.
 
F

frank11

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  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #17
I am not sure you could get a shock through two plastic connectors, and some damp wood. But anyway looking at your electrics, if you are concerned about safety etc. I suggest you upgrade your fusebox to a modern one with RCD protection as soon as possible. As an aside did you have a wet floor and bare feet when experiencing these shocks? I also wonder, when the bath actually leaked on Thursday, did no one else get a shock from the taps? Is it only you that got a shock some three days later? Were you touching both taps?
No wet floor (can't remember about bare feet)
No one got a shock until Sunday night but I worked out you only got a shock if the hallway light was on so maybe Friday and Saturday we happened to not use the taps when the light was on.
The shock happened if you only touched 1 tap
 
Wilko

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Hi Frank, for what it’s worth I agree with above posts - this incident was likely not caused by Mr Plumber using plastic fittings. After water leaks on the top floor it’s quite common for the downstairs lights to be affected.

The pic of your fuse box worries me as it seems to show a switch or junction box floating about?
 
snowhead

snowhead

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Mentor
Appreciate all your comments and guidance.

I'm not too concerned to find out where the offending section is where the issue was created when I had the leak as its now dried out (and I don't plan on having a leak) but more looking to find out whether having an earth bond would stop the taps getting live/producing an electric shock if there were a leak in the future.

It's ESSENTIAL that the source of the problem be found, whether it's a fault of the bathroom refit or pre-existing.
You can never know if you're going to have a leak and exactly the same conditions occour.

Having an RCD on the lighting circuit won't remove the issue, it's still possible to get a non lethal but uncomfortable shock without tripping an RCD.
Testing may not find the issue if it's a screw or nail only touching the Live.
Hopefully whoever you get in won't give up untill they've found the source of the problem.

If I was looking into it I'd use an Endoscope /Boroscope camera to look up into the floor through where the hall light is fixed, to avoid any unneccesary damage initially to see if there is anything obvious.
Next would be remove the bath panel and look under there.
 
telectrix

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skimmed through but agree with preceding posts. copper pipes under sink and bath, if preceded by plastic, are not extraneous and should not be bonded. the sparks who suggested this should be taken out and shot in the goolies, then sent on a course to understand the purpose of bonding. it seems you have an underlying fault which manifested iteself due to a water leak. sack both electrician and plumber, and then get an expert in each field to fix.
 
freddo

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I'm not too concerned to find out where the offending section is where the issue was created when I had the leak as its now dried out
I'm reasonably confident if Emma Shaw was still alive she would be less than pleased to hear that comment.
 
James

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It is entirely possible that there is no fault with the electrics, a ceiling rose could be wired with no permanent live, even if it has a permanent live, the switched live is normally on the outside of the rose.

Any water creeping into the rose is likely to contact the switched live far before the permanent live. Tracking back through the wet woodwork in the house until it finds a path to earth.

If there is an rcd supplying the circuit, the path to earth through the timber and back to earth via multiple paths is going to trip the rcd well before any risk of shock occurs.

The simple fact is, the system installed because of its age is unable to detect the type of fault that occurred.

Modern rcd’s Or rcbo’s would have turned off the power, probably before the shock risk was there, but certainly the moment a shock was felt the power would be switched off as the device would trip in less than 0.03 seconds (less than a blink of an eye to the layman)
 
Midwest

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No wet floor (can't remember about bare feet)
No one got a shock until Sunday night but I worked out you only got a shock if the hallway light was on so maybe Friday and Saturday we happened to not use the taps when the light was on.
The shock happened if you only touched 1 tap
I had something not too dissimilar, a story I’ve recanted here many times. Long story, shortened. Complete bathroom refurb. Plumber was getting shocks when touching copper pipes and newly plastered wall. All walls in vicinity of bathroom had voltage to earth. Sometimes rcd would trip. Turns out previous owner had installed some dado rail on the landing years previously, with nail just nicking cable (stripper) to landing light.

As already said, get a competent electrician in to do some testing.
 
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