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Hi guys what would you code a wall light fitting mounted about 300mm away from an oak beamed cieling? The fitting has led lamps fitted but could be replaced with halogen etc?
 

Strima

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Arms
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Is it any different to having a straight batten holder in the ceiling?
 
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Must admit my initial thoughts was c3 as the top of the lamp is 300mm from combustible surface but also it’s a twin arm candle holder type wall light and the sides of the lamps are only 150-200 away from beamed wall so maybe I’m over thinking this. There’s no signs of any overheating etc
 

Risteard

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No code, it would take a lot more than an incandescent lamp to cause an oak beam to catch fire.
In Ireland RECI are quite strict about luminaries too close to combustible surfaces and would expect it changed for an LED luminaire marked as suitable for mounting on/near combustible surfaces with non-replaceable lamps.

As such it's something I would avoid.
 

davesparks

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In Ireland RECI are quite strict about luminaries too close to combustible surfaces and would expect it changed for an LED luminaire marked as suitable for mounting on/near combustible surfaces with non-replaceable lamps.

As such it's something I would avoid.
How exactly is combustible defined by Reci?
I can appreciate if it was a readily combustible softwood being discussed here, but Oak just isn't readily combustible.
Oak and a few other hardwoods have been tested by various companies who manufacture wooden switches for suitability as enclosures for electrical connections and they pass.
 

Risteard

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Arms
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How exactly is combustible defined by Reci?
I can appreciate if it was a readily combustible softwood being discussed here, but Oak just isn't readily combustible.
Oak and a few other hardwoods have been tested by various companies who manufacture wooden switches for suitability as enclosures for electrical connections and they pass.
It's an interesting question, and I suppose you could try to argue that with the Inspector. I'm not sure whether they have considered the properties of different types of wood or not. With the move to LED lighting though I suppose it's becoming less and less of an issue.
 

davesparks

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It's an interesting question, and I suppose you could try to argue that with the Inspector.
Its the same question that there still doesn't seem to be an answer for regarding consumer units.

There are standards and tests out there which test combustibility, but no answer as to which one should be used in these situations.
 

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