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Discuss Electric shocks 110V/230V in the Industrial Electrician Talk area at ElectriciansForums.net

J

Jumbonipondon_squilobidon

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The 110V CTE is safer than 230V as you will only get a 55V belt. I believe you have to view the human body as a fixed resistor and apply Ohms law.

Reading many other forums some people believe 110V is more dangerous as it will draw approx double the current than a 230V system for the same wattage power tool. :eek:
 
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S

Shakey

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  • #2
Yes you are right that the 110V power tool will draw double the current, but that doesnt make it more dangerous

Yes, apply ohms law, so your body will have a resistance based on yourbody iteslf, wether or not you are wet etc

So when the voltage is applied to your body, you will draw an amount of current from the supply, once that current reaches a sufficient level (and that is only in milliamps) you peg out.

so, the current flowing in the cable (your 110V analogy) is irrelevant, it is the voltage being applied to you that will dictate the anount of current you revieve under shock conditions

So if you were a fixed resistor, the amount of shock current will be roughly half going from 230V down to 110V, and halved again because its CTE, which you quite rightly state is 55V fault voltage

And all of this is why, under the 17th, the requirement for 110V CTE power tools on construction sites is removed, because with a 30mA RCd protected supply, with a max resistance of 1667 ohms for Zs, the maximum fault voltage will be 50V before the RCD disconnects you from the fault (assuming a fault to earth)
 
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