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Discuss Electric shower disconnetion in the DIY Electrical Forum area at ElectriciansForums.net

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Good morning everyone!
Got a question for you, I'm currently remodelling my bathroom and the electric shower is being removed and a thermostatic shower type mixer tap is replacing it.
My question is can i just disconnect the cable going from the shower to the load side of the pull chord isolator switch on the ceiling, and leave the isolator switch and cable that goes from it to the consumer unit in place ? Is it safe to leave the cable from the consumer unit to the bathroom isolator switch connected? Or should I get it all disconnected fully, which will require me getting an electrician out, as I know my limitations and I'm not going anywhere near the consumer unit apart from using it to switch off the electric that is😁
 
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SparkyChick

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Yes it should be safe to leave the cable from the consumer unit to the shower isolator connected and in place. Since both ends should be fully contained. You should turn off the circuit at the consumer unit, and when disconnecting it... since your post implies you aren't an electrician (and thus are not likely to have all the test gear we have at our disposal to ensure things are truly dead)... turn off all the power using the main switch on the consumer unit.
 
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Yes it should be safe to leave the cable from the consumer unit to the shower isolator connected and in place. Since both ends should be fully contained. You should turn off the circuit at the consumer unit, and when disconnecting it... since your post implies you aren't an electrician (and thus are not likely to have all the test gear we have at our disposal to ensure things are truly dead)... turn off all the power using the main switch on the consumer unit.
Wow! That was a quick reply I'm impressed, I do have a multimeter for checking if there is any power present , although that said I would have switched all the power off at the consumer unit as you suggested anyway, thank you very much for your reply I appreciate it😊
 

SparkyChick

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Just so you know... a multimeter is not regarded as an approved method for proving something is dead. I have a multimeter but it lives at home in the warm and only ever makes it into the van if I'm debugging wired alarms or something similar. For proving dead I (and I hope everyone else) uses an approved voltage indicator such as the Fluke T series.

But as someone else has mentioned in another thread... do not ever use a neon screwdriver... if you have one, bin it :)
 

SparkyChick

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what's with the nutters with a neon screwdrivers ,beggers to believe .
It might have something to do with the fact that they are still being sold and are even included in packs of drivers. Wiha for example include one in their multipack. They should be banned as far as I'm concerned.
 
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I don't know why they still put them in screwdriver sets? The CK ones that we bought have them. The only time I have used it is for 2nd fixing pendants.
 

telectrix

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i use one for small terminal screws. having first removed the internal bits from the handle.
 
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  • #9
Just so you know... a multimeter is not regarded as an approved method for proving something is dead. I have a multimeter but it lives at home in the warm and only ever makes it into the van if I'm debugging wired alarms or something similar. For proving dead I (and I hope everyone else) uses an approved voltage indicator such as the Fluke T series.

But as someone else has mentioned in another thread... do not ever use a neon screwdriver... if you have one, bin it :)
I don't own a neon screwdriver as I've read about them not being safe, but I'm glad you've warned me against using the multimeter, as I was under the impression they were ok to check for power, thanks for that info. I shall look into buying the fluke tester now.
 
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