Bulk Workwear - Clothing Suppliers for the Whole Forum Network
This official sponsor may provide discounts for members

Discuss electrical theory power question in the Electrical Courses and Electrical NVQ's area at ElectriciansForums.net

S

sa87uk

Welcome to ElectriciansForums.net - The American Electrical Advice Forum
Head straight to the main forums to chat by click here:  American Electrical Advice Forum

1)[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]Two impedances Z1= 6 /_40ºΩ and Z2= 10 /_30ºΩ are connected in series and have a total reactive power of 1650VAR lagging. Determine;
a)[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]The average power
b)[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]The apparent power
[FONT=&quot]c) The power factor

anybody got any ideas?
[/FONT]
 
Test Meter - Forum Sponsors since 2007!
This official sponsor may provide discounts for members
M

Mac

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #2
All About Circuits I hope this is of some help.My head is spinning at the moment.Haven't done this for years;)

Search this site

Table of Contents:

Recently Viewed:
Volume II - AC » POWER FACTOR »
True, Reactive, and Apparent power


We know that reactive loads such as inductors and capacitors dissipate zero power, yet the fact that they drop voltage and draw current gives the deceptive impression that they actually do dissipate power. This “phantom power” is called reactive power, and it is measured in a unit called Volt-Amps-Reactive (VAR), rather than watts. The mathematical symbol for reactive power is (unfortunately) the capital letter Q. The actual amount of power being used, or dissipated, in a circuit is called true power, and it is measured in watts (symbolized by the capital letter P, as always). The combination of reactive power and true power is called apparent power, and it is the product of a circuit's voltage and current, without reference to phase angle. Apparent power is measured in the unit of Volt-Amps (VA) and is symbolized by the capital letter S.
As a rule, true power is a function of a circuit's dissipative elements, usually resistances (R). Reactive power is a function of a circuit's reactance (X). Apparent power is a function of a circuit's total impedance (Z). Since we're dealing with scalar quantities for power calculation, any complex starting quantities such as voltage, current, and impedance must be represented by their polar magnitudes, not by real or imaginary rectangular components. For instance, if I'm calculating true power from current and resistance, I must use the polar magnitude for current, and not merely the “real” or “imaginary” portion of the current. If I'm calculating apparent power from voltage and impedance, both of these formerly complex quantities must be reduced to their polar magnitudes for the scalar arithmetic.
There are several power equations relating the three types of power to resistance, reactance, and impedance (all using scalar quantities):

Please note that there are two equations each for the calculation of true and reactive power. There are three equations available for the calculation of apparent power, P=IE being useful only for that purpose. Examine the following circuits and see how these three types of power interrelate for: a purely resistive load in Figure below, a purely reactive load in Figure below, and a resistive/reactive load in Figure below.
Resistive load only:

True power, reactive power, and apparent power for a purely resistive load.
Reactive load only:

True power, reactive power, and apparent power for a purely reactive load.
Resistive/reactive load:

True power, reactive power, and apparent power for a resistive/reactive load.
These three types of power -- true, reactive, and apparent -- relate to one another in trigonometric form. We call this the power triangle: (Figure below).

Power triangle relating appearant power to true power and reactive power.
Using the laws of trigonometry, we can solve for the length of any side (amount of any type of power), given the lengths of the other two sides, or the length of one side and an angle.
  • REVIEW:
  • Power dissipated by a load is referred to as true power. True power is symbolized by the letter P and is measured in the unit of Watts (W).
  • Power merely absorbed and returned in load due to its reactive properties is referred to as reactive power. Reactive power is symbolized by the letter Q and is measured in the unit of Volt-Amps-Reactive (VAR).
  • Total power in an AC circuit, both dissipated and absorbed/returned is referred to as apparent power. Apparent power is symbolized by the letter S and is measured in the unit of Volt-Amps (VA).
  • These three types of power are trigonometrically related to one another. In a right triangle, P = adjacent length, Q = opposite length, and S = hypotenuse length. The opposite angle is equal to the circuit's impedance (Z) phase angle.



 
L

lister

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #3
WOW!!
what a reply:D (i'm gobsmacked)
 
A

acat

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #4
Gotta get a prize for best reply

Chris
 
CK Tools :) The professionals choice when it comes to Electrical Tools
This official sponsor may provide discounts for members

Reply to electrical theory power question in the Electrical Courses and Electrical NVQ's area at ElectriciansForums.net

Electrical2Go - Online Electrical Supplier
This official sponsor may provide discounts for members
Top Bottom