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Welshsparky

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Can anybody tell me exactly what i need to use to install a few ethernet points around the house

From a sparky with no networking experience at all!
 
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topquark

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Arms
Switch or Hub to connect the house router to and feed the new points.

Router ---->Switch ---->(RJ45 Socket)

You'll probably need a Switch with the appropriate number of ports on (one per RJ45 socket) unless your existing router has enough spare ports. You'll need RJ45 plugs, Cat 5E minimum (or cat 6 if using very high bandwidth ie HDMI video feeding), RJ45 socket per outlet point. Get yourself a decent crone punch tool as well.
 
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Barry Rathbone

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  • #3
Just done this in my house,
I found an area to fit master phone socket, moved it to this point: relocated adsl router(5port).wire 12 cables CAT5e screened because i had it in stock.
All cables run away from mains as much as practical of course.Ideally a straight run top to bottom but not always possible.
16 port switch with all 1gb connection (all connections used), £50-£60.
Face plates to suit preferably at both ends and patch leads to switch.
All cables connected as B, A would give crossover and we don't want that do we ....
Network tester from RS / maplin, cheapest you can find if you only doing this once...
 
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Welshsparky

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  • #4
Would i need a switch or could i go directly into the router? Im only running 2 points
 

telectrix

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if you fit rj45 plugs on your cat5e-plug into the router.
 

Strima

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Got 60m of Cat5e, 100 terminals, 100 various covers, crimp tool, tester and punch from a well known auction site for just over £30. Quick watch on youtube and have never needed to buy another patch cable since, easy enough to do and have never had to buy a cable since.
 
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Octopus

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  • #7
Or use your existing T&E courtsey of powerline products
 
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Spark1979

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  • #8
Can go direct into router for two points only need switch for more points, simply a switch splits the signal into however points you have
 

Jimmy Boy

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Arms
As above really,back box, RJ45 module, punch down tool, modules are colour coded same as cables, just keep the twists as tight as poss in the terminations.CAT6 is a bit more install fussy
J
 

kingeri

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Arms
Ideally use a switch with a few more ports than you need. And don't run the cat5e near electric cables! The toughest part is terminating the cat5e into the sockets/plugs.....you need the right crimping tool. If you've never done it before, it'll take a few attempts and a bit of practice/patience! And get a tester, as mentioned, dirt cheap on feebay.
 
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vernam616

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  • #11
I have recently done the same, My netgear wireless router has 4 ethernet ports on the back and although my TV and ps3 connected to the network via WiFi, i stuck 2 cat5e cables down for a faster connection

Waste of time really as i havnt seen much difference

In my opinion, buy a wireless router( a decent one), usually all new pieces of tech have some way of connecting to your wireless network, i can stream a film via WiFi seamlessly direct to my TV
 

Jimmy Boy

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Arms
Get a ringing tool as well, it makes stripping the outer covering off easy peasy, and nice and tidy to tie off in the module
J
 

kingeri

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Arms
I have recently done the same, My netgear wireless router has 4 ethernet ports on the back and although my TV and ps3 connected to the network via WiFi, i stuck 2 cat5e cables down for a faster connection

Waste of time really as i havnt seen much difference

In my opinion, buy a wireless router( a decent one), usually all new pieces of tech have some way of connecting to your wireless network, i can stream a film via WiFi seamlessly direct to my TV
Depends what you use the network for. Moving large/numerous files around, streaming HD etc. will always be much faster on a wired gigabit network. Also, if there are multiple users on the network, wired is a no-brainer.
 
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Barry Rathbone

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  • #14
I have a 8tb Nas drive so reallly, in my case 10/100 ain't an option.As stated faster file transfer.Even with a few connections its better to get the best.
Money well spent for me, 3 ps3's, ipods agogo.....laptops... streaming... =Flawless :hurray:
Oh and patch leads atw for me sorry .5m from scambay pence, or as said make em.. you really want to replace a whole cable when damaged ,nope...imo of course..
 
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vernam616

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  • #15
Agree Kingeri, all depends on what exactly you want

I find my system more than capable for what the home requires
 
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Ponty Massive

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  • #16
I've just put apple airport express around the house. Wireless network, fantastic!!!
 
Hi, If the router has enough ports its easy, just run cable with rj45 from each port to each pc . Just see how the first one is wired and repeat from the other ports with longer cables. routers usually have about 4 ports so you can repeat repeat 4 times.Most people in domestic premisis use wireless connections or powerline adapters. powerline adaptors just plug in to electrical socket at the router end and at a plug socket near each pc. you can get these from Argos. either options are suitable .I use wireless for my laptops and powerline for kids xbox.just saves running cables . Just remember everything runs from the router.So, its from the phone socket (micro filter ADSL port) that the broadband enters into the router and out of the router to each PC.hope this helps
 
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billyb76

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  • #19
Always go for wired networks.
Wireless technology is only half-duplex, this is means it can not send and receive data at the same time.
Even with wireless N using MIMO.

Wireless is fine for surfing the net, but if you have PS3's, xbox or wanting to stream video etc always go for a wired network.

If you only want 2 extra points, why not buy long patch leads and plug them into your router & the other end into your device.
Not proper way to do it, but ok for the home use & will save you a lot of time if you never done it before.

Just make sure you use good quallity cat5E or cat6 cable and not copper clad aluminium (CCA) cheap s**t that gets sold on ebay or even some wholesalers sell.

Oh yea were abouts are u in wales mate, Im in North Wales. If your not far I could help u out
 

Jimmy Boy

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Arms
Yep i hard wired all my rooms in 5e will set me up nicely when we get Fibre optic BB, i have heard rumours of CAT 7..what you heard ?
J
 
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