Wetroom Store - Network Wetroom Suppliers
This official sponsor may provide discounts for members

Discuss Exposed T and E's during test. in the Periodic Inspection Reporting & Certification area at ElectriciansForums.net

Welcome to ElectriciansForums.net - The American Electrical Advice Forum
Head straight to the main forums to chat by click here:  American Electrical Advice Forum

Hi, I am new to this forum and can't find an exact match to my search.
I am new to testing and inspection and have come across a db mounted in a garage on the wall whereby the t and e's for all circuits are clipped direct to the wall before entering the ceiling approx 1m above.
Is this deemed as a C2 or C3 on test cert?

Thanks.
 
Scolmore Electrical Products
This official sponsor may provide discounts for members

Andy78

-
Mentor
Arms
Esteemed
The cable's sheath is sufficient to protect the basic insulation. What's the issue you perceive and which regulations do you think this is against ?
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #8
Thanks all. My thinking is with reference to the condition report section 4.16 where the cables are not mechanically protected.

IMG-20190423-WA0010.jpg
 

Andy78

-
Mentor
Arms
Esteemed
Thanks all. My thinking is with reference to the condition report section 4.16 where the cables are not mechanically protected.
What do the regulations referenced in section 4.16 have to say about the example of wiring you are inspecting ?
 
N

Nigel

The outer sheath is classed as mechanical protection. The environment the cables are installed in will dictate if it is sufficient mechanical protection. For example T&E clipped on a wall at high level with nothing around it would not warrant any code. T&E clipped just above a shelf used for heavy items may warrant a C2/3.
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #12
What do the regulations referenced in section 4.16 have to say about the example of wiring you are inspecting ?
Hi Andy. Thanks for your help on this. Really appreciated. I have re-read the sections in the regs and they refer to mechanical strain, not mechanical protection as I had read it earlier too hastily.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #13
The outer sheath is classed as mechanical protection. The environment the cables are installed in will dictate if it is sufficient mechanical protection. For example T&E clipped on a wall at high level with nothing around it would not warrant any code. T&E clipped just above a shelf used for heavy items may warrant a C2/3.
Thank you. I perceived the regs incorrectly.
 

Ian1981

-
Mentor
Arms
Esteemed
A code maybe deemed necessary if the top of the consumer units IP rating (IP4X) is compromised where the cables enter the enclosure
 
On an older existing installs I am not overly fussed about clipped direct so long as it shows no evidence of damage.
I have clipped twin and earth in my garage from new been there for 30+ years and absolutely fine with this.
Same with older installs with non rcd on the lighting I am not overly concerned.
I have non rcd lighting.

Now if in the OP the cable sheathing was all chaffed and bashed up I would suggest so over capping
 
In the U.K. the outer pvc sheath is considered mechanical protection on twin and earth

Now in America and Canada the outer jacket is not classed as mechanical protection and if run on wall should be either in flexicon or ridged con-do-it or boxed in
 
Hi, I am new to this forum and can't find an exact match to my search.
I am new to testing and inspection and have come across a db mounted in a garage on the wall whereby the t and e's for all circuits are clipped direct to the wall before entering the ceiling approx 1m above.
Is this deemed as a C2 or C3 on test cert?

Thanks.
Have you done the actual course in testing???
Because if you had you would know .
According to your question you don' t seem to know what these codes mean.
 

Charlie_

-
Arms
You should purchase one of the coding books from the scheme that you are registered with..
In that way you will be educating yourself and coding in accordance with the ones you are affiliated with
 

dksanders

-
Arms
Hi Andy. Thanks for your help on this. Really appreciated. I have re-read the sections in the regs and they refer to mechanical strain, not mechanical protection as I had read it earlier too hastily.
There's no reference to Mechanical Strain in reg 416.
 
Bit of a goatish question, but at least he asked, and didn't just condemn the job and sell the customer a new fireproof cu like many would have done....
 

Des 56

-
Arms
Esteemed
The irony of this thread (which I have only just read) is that the op wanted to code the clipping of the cables and was rightly lambasted for his decision
The coding of the cables would have been justified, had he picked up on "how" they have been clipped rather than "because" they were clipped
 

Paignton pete

-
Arms
Esteemed
The bloke made a mistake, give him a break! Some of you guys are so smart [email protected]#ed!
I would normally agree but to make a mistake on the simplest of issues warrant some of the responses. Especially if someone is paying him to do an accurate EICR. That customer deserves better.

Even I who likes to help rather than criticise think his understanding is shocking.
 

littlespark

-
Arms
Esteemed
The guy doesn’t deserve a lynch mob though.

It was a simple question where he’s a little confused, a simple answer would suffice.... and maybe a couple of “agrees”...

Qualified or not, ongoing experience is a valuable asset
 

DPG

-
Arms
Esteemed
Patron
Well done Sherlock!
Who, apart from you even mentioned regulation 416??

I suggest you pay a little bit more attention before you go jumping in with silly comments
He does mention 4.16 in post #8.
 
uHeat Banner - Forum Discount Available
This official sponsor may provide discounts for members

Reply to Exposed T and E's during test. in the Periodic Inspection Reporting & Certification area at ElectriciansForums.net

Instyle LED Lighting Specialists UK
This official sponsor may provide discounts for members
Top Bottom