Discuss Feed to new oven in the Electrical Wiring, Theories and Regulations area at ElectriciansForums.net

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christian

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Hello, i wonder if anyone could help.I'm fitting a new oven in an extension thats being built. I've ripped the old oven out and the old feed. The new oven is a 2.4kw.What amp breaker would you use and what size cable.I was thinking 32 amp a friend said 40 amp would be better suited. Any info would be much appreciated guys!
 
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sounds like a single oven to me 2400watts/230= 10.4 amps so could go on a plug top or wired via fused spur using a 13 amp fuse
 
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Spudnik

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  • #3
Any cooking appliance rated over 2kW should have its own dedicated circuit from the CU.

In which case this would need a 16A MCB.

This work is also covered by Part P and must be notified to LABC.
 
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christian

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #4
Any cooking appliance rated over 2kW should have its own dedicated circuit from the CU.

In which case this would need a 16A MCB.

This work is also covered by Part P and must be notified to LABC.
I have'nt got my part p as a friend is going to ticket it for me, and the buildings inspector has been out and its all above board.Would u have it on a radial or ring ? Cheers for your help

sounds like a single oven to me 2400watts/230= 10.4 amps so could go on a plug top or wired via fused spur using a 13 amp fuse
Thanks mate !
 
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I have'nt got my part p as a friend is going to ticket it for me, and the buildings inspector has been out and its all above board.Would u have it on a radial or ring ? Cheers for your help

Thanks mate !
This is not a regulation only a guidance im sorry if you dont like my response dont ask if you dont want peoples opinions, this guidance is part of the 17th edition which unfortunatley i havent done yet i personally would look at the circuit and make my decision and would probably still put it on a plug top or spur depends on the job though!!!
 
D

drywax

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  • #6
I work in kitchens and most new ovens today only require a plug or a 13A fused spare as stated above but remeber if you conceal any plugs etc you must have a visible isolation point ie 13A switched fused spare same with any integrated appliances
 
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Staffie

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  • #7
Personally, I'd wire it in 4mm (radial) on a 16A mcb straight into a cooker point.

Who knows, you may upgrade to a larger cooker in the future?!
 
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christian

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #8
This is not a regulation only a guidance im sorry if you dont like my response dont ask if you dont want peoples opinions, this guidance is part of the 17th edition which unfortunatley i havent done yet i personally would look at the circuit and make my decision and would probably still put it on a plug top or spur depends on the job though!!!
Had a bad day mate ??? I thanked you for your reply.Where does it look like i dont want your opinion
 
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Spudnik

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #9
I work in kitchens and most new ovens today only require a plug or a 13A fused spare as stated above but remeber if you conceal any plugs etc you must have a visible isolation point ie 13A switched fused spare same with any integrated appliances
Im all for making life easier, however, IDEALLY, any cooking appliance rated over 2kW SHOULD have its own dedicated radial circuit - P362 BS7671 - and not be connected to a RFC to prevent any part of the circuit from exceeding the C.C.C of the cable for long periods.

If a new circuit is being installed anyway, then id run a 6mm to a single socket for the oven, so that its future proof.
 
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christian

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #10
Im all for making life easier, however, IDEALLY, any cooking appliance rated over 2kW SHOULD have its own dedicated radial circuit - P362 BS7671 - and not be connected to a RFC to prevent any part of the circuit from exceeding the C.C.C of the cable for long periods.

If a new circuit is being installed anyway, then id run a 6mm to a single socket for the oven, so that its future proof.
Thanks jason.I have'nt got my part p so could you tell me if this would pass 17th and building regs ??
 
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Spudnik

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #11
Thanks jason.I have'nt got my part p so could you tell me if this would pass 17th and building regs ??
It would pass provided the correct routes and various other factors are taken into consideration when the cable is being installed.

However, this must be notified to your LABC before work starts and, for a fee, will come and do the required tests etc to confirm it all complies.

Other than that, get in an electrician who can self certify to do the work.
 

benji

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Arms
All this part P crap makes you think about moving to Scotland
yours benji
 

benji

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Arms
Iwas led to believe that over the border they didn't fall for the part P con. like we did
yours benji
 
L

lionelmcc

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  • #15
no part P, no domestic installers scheme either.
I can register with NICIEC in England but not in Scotland
This is really a topic for a new thread
 
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