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Discuss Feeding switches in the Electrical Wiring, Theories and Regulations area at ElectriciansForums.net

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bgec

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Hi guys, does anyone know of a regulation that provents you from feeding switches in a domestic lighting circuit. I can't think of one but i need a second opinion as someone questioned it and made me doubt myself.
Not that I am a sesItive guy or anything, thanks.
 
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ian.settle1

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Mentor
Arms
Hi guys, does anyone know of a regulation that provents you from feeding switches in a domestic lighting circuit. I can't think of one but i need a second opinion as someone questioned it and made me doubt myself.
Not that I am a sesItive guy or anything, thanks.
Depends what you want to feed them?

Bananas
Peanuts
Crisps
Stickey Buns

No, seriously what do you mean by feeding switches as if you don't take a supply to them you can't switch a light on!
 
B

bgec

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #3
Depends what you want to feed them?

Bananas
Peanuts
Crisps
Stickey Buns

No, seriously what do you mean by feeding switches as if you don't take a supply to them you can't switch a light on!
sorry, feed in and out of the switch insted of the fitting (3 plate ) due to the nature of the fittings i can only have one t&e out of the celling and i dont want to use JBs as access to them would be a nightmear
 
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Spudnik

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #4
Perfectly acceptable to run circuit to switches.

Fill ya boots.
 
L

Lew1s

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #5
Yeah, i was taught loop in and out of switches before i even learnt 3 plate lol. It's perfectly fine.
 
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sparkz

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #6
I was told by another electrician that feeding switching is wrong because you have a floating connection (neutral) at the switch. :confused:
 
J

jaldred

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #7
Not sure what a "floating connection" is???
Must mean the Neutrals in a connector block behind the switch?
It's common practice to wire in this manner - particularly new build and the only advice i've ever been given with regard to this is to stick to either feeds at switches or at fittings in any one property, easier when it comes to 2nd fixing, not having to remember where your feeds are and i guess future fault finding?
 
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beaver74

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #8
when i worked for a nic company we were knock back for floating conectors on a switch so we started using a glue gun to give a fixed conection for the neutral
 
It amazes me where some of these old wives tales are conceived from.If you had to wire to a track light (two -plate i.e feed to switch) would be the only sensible way to wire it.It would be impractible to bring three cables to it.Also if you have to have a neon at a switch,what would you have to take there " yes " a neutral.
 
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heathelect

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #10
3 plating at switch position is not a problem, weve been doing it for years, especially when youve got fancy fittings , spotlights, chandeliers, tracklights outside lights, etc,etc, in a bathroom i always 3 plate at the fan isolator, leaving only 1 cable to lights, fan and switch, its so easy,no connectors for neutrals needed then, but you need to install 25mm deep boxes. regards dave :):):)
 
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Ross Trician

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #11
Morning all,
just to say I always take the L/N/E to the switch and then the S_L/N/E to the fitting. I do this now as it is easier to run the S_L/N/E to each light that dont have facitilies to terminate as you can with a ceiling rose plate. it saves using junction boxes or connector blocks. Keeps it tidyier and easier to work on in the future if addition lighting is needed in the room.

I used to take the feed cables to the ceiling rose first but then became a hassle when they decide to have spots and wall lights.

cheers, ross
 
U

UK_Night_Owl

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #12
If it's any help, at college the other week, we were told that it is an accepted way to run the supply feed to the light switch and to used a connector block for the neutral. The instructor did however go on to say that, technically though, according to the regulations, any connection should be made to a fixed terminal and not left lose. - Like beaver74 said, a little attention with a glue gun could render a once lose / floating terminal into a fixed one.

Hope this helps

David
 
H

hamlettphil

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #13
i wired new houses and flats for nearly 7 years and thats how i was tought, to switch feed. personally it makes it easier to fit the jazzy light fittings the new homeowner buys and wants you to fit.
 
S

sparkyork

alot of valid points here and to sum it up there is definately nothing wrong with looping at the light switch etc. whether you glue a connector block in the back box is upto you as individuals, end of the day if you dress the cables properly within the box your not gonna have any problems...think that is more important than glueing a connector in.

anyone fancy inventing a standard switch plate with neutral connection on it (for loop purposes? or why not have dp switch like the grid switches!!)
 
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heathelect

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #15
alot of valid points here and to sum it up there is definately nothing wrong with looping at the light switch etc. whether you glue a connector block in the back box is upto you as individuals, end of the day if you dress the cables properly within the box your not gonna have any problems...think that is more important than glueing a connector in.

anyone fancy inventing a standard switch plate with neutral connection on it (for loop purposes? or why not have dp switch like the grid switches!!)

D.P. switch is great idea ive used them a few times, but had trouble finding a D.P. 2way switch !!!!!!!!, dave:D:D:D:D
 
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