Discuss Had a look at a new house yesterday. in the Periodic Inspection Reporting & Certification area at ElectriciansForums.net

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Rob

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It's a 20 year old house when inspecting the CU I see a new garage type Rcd Mcb unit installed . I asked if they had the test certs for it.

The response from the estate agent was that most houses don't have them so why was I worrying (I haddn't told him my profession ).

Question is with the cu being the age it is and it's probably DIY work on it how do I stand on requesting getting the house tested?

Ill apologise now for not googling/spelling/grammar/sence in this post. I've just got off working a 23hour shift and in desperate need of sleep. Lol
 

plugsandsparks

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You could make an EICR a condition of sale with the remedials at their cost, or put in an offer that reflects your concerns. If it was me i would forget about the electrics and make sure the roof is sound, the owner has title, no recent subsidence, no dry rot / wet rot, no airport being built etc. Basically anything i cannot fix.
I did my own searches for the house we are in now, just booked an appointment with planning and asked to see all the planning applications over a given area, was much better than relying on a standard conveyance.
 

Guitarist

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Considering that a new CU and a possible rewire is a serious amount of money, I don't think this should be dismissed out of hand. I agree with P&S about the other stuff, but if this is a DIY job, then there could be all kinds of gremlins to put right. Offer to do an EICR for £200, and if satisfactory, you will consider what offer to make :)
 
G

Guest55

I dont see what the issue is ??
You're a spark thinking of buying this house ?
What difference does it make if they have certs or not for a garage CU ?
Hardly a deal breaker in property market lol.
 

stef

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Shouldn't this covered by this HIP thingy or has this been scrapped by now? I always thought a recent PIR has to be part od a survey? Or am I wrong?
 

oldtimer

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In an ideal world you would get handed a folder with all and any relivent information but this is the real world and that aint going to happen soon. I got a call from a guy who had bough t a 15 year old £475k house and he asked for a EICR I asked for what reason he said well I am going to live there so this is the time to get it looked at plus he got it done within the 7 days defects reporting (Scottish Law) so if there was a main problem then he can report it to lodge a claim and my view is thats how it should be all over the country where the buyer has 7-14 days to highlight any defects leaving the seller to compensate them this would stop cheapo jobs getting done as the owner is going to have to sort it out when they sell
 

stef

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Totally agree, you can claim on a car, a tv, a chair but not on a house. You could end up with the most expensive ripp off.
 
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Rob

Rob

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This is what I'm wondering, I'm not bothered if the house needs work electrically (only work really other than that is cosmetic, painting etc...), to tell you the truth I'll probably end up re-wiring anyway. It's not a factor on wether I'll make an offer.

I could test it myself that's not a problem but I don't want the estate agent thinking I'm just trying to get money off the price by making up faults. I don't really want to pay a 3rd party to test as its an extra cost and im still unsure if I'm even going to make an offer.

What I was wondering because it has been worked on obviously in the last couple of years (and yes if it was DIY they won't have test certs) they should legally have something.

All I was wondering if I have any legal ground because to get it tested before I even make an offer, so If it does need work I can taylor my offer to suit.
 

plugsandsparks

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Dunno, need a lawyer to answer that, does sound like you are looking for a negotiation angle, i think you may be unique in this approach, so just make an offer in the normal way. When i moved into mine it took me 4 hours to get the lights to work. Outgoing owners stripped all the dimmers and light fittings and left a load of taped up wires and randomly installed wires into switches, just what i needed after a long day.
 
G

Guest55

Dunno, need a lawyer to answer that, does sound like you are looking for a negotiation angle, i think you may be unique in this approach, so just make an offer in the normal way. When i moved into mine it took me 4 hours to get the lights to work. Outgoing owners stripped all the dimmers and light fittings and left a load of taped up wires and randomly installed wires into switches, just what i needed after a long day.
you could have asked your solicitor to file a claim for wilful damage against the previous owners even after the sale.
unacceptable and selfish way to handle a property transaction imo.
 
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