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I need help!,

Im not the most experienced when it comes to emergency lighting, i have only ever installed pre designed basic systems, On Monday im going to quote on a job doing the periodic emergency lighting inspection on a big-ish public entertainments venue, can anyone give me any pointers as to how they attack/ go about this and any tips.

Thanks guys!
 
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Hi High Tower

I would google emergency lighting requirments, try and get hold of relavet BS guide. I've looked can't find my copy.

Good Luck
T&E
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #3
I'm not too bad with the requirements and I can manage with installs it's the periodic inspections I'm not sure about.
 
Hi High tower

Tried to add attachement but dont know how to do it PM me and I'll send it to you, but not sure if it will help. I used to have a load of stuff on this is case I ever got involved with this type of work, but never did
T&E
 
B

BigBreakfast

I should read posts more clearly in future, dohhh.
 
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Here you go hightower:- Emergency Lighting Inspection and Testing RegulationsAccording to British Standard BS5266, it is recommended that Emergency Lighting inspection and testing frequencies are as follows:Monthly: A maximum of 1/4 of the time for the batteries. Six MonthlyAnnual: One hour for a three hour system.Annually: Test for 3 hours continued discharge.*During each test, the emergency lights should be checked for correct operation. After testing, the electricity supply should be restored and then checked to ensure the emergency lighting system is charging correctly. All testing and results should be documented in log books on site.Also check for any dark spots on exit routes and stairs. If the lamps don't operate, test the charge on the battery/s and replace as and when needed. In some commercial areas the lamps may have dust build up on them so give them a wipe with some glass cleaner. Whilst the EM units are receiving charge, check that the led is lit. What I do is write down a basic diagram of the premises starting at the main door or the dis board and number each unit clockwise. How many units per switch and location of the switch. Switch off and every 20-30 minutes have a walk around and write down on your diagram how long the battery lasted if they don't last the 3 hours, the battery needs replacing. Hope that helps HT.
 

topquark

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Mentor
Arms
A quick brain dump: Guessing you may need to factor in hire of a lift of some sort (and possibly training?) depending on the venue's ceiling heights.

You may need to come up with a labelling scheme for the accessories, so factor in the cost for that when reviewing for inspection quote (should already have been done and regularly tested (and kept with alarm paper work), but not always available!).

Note accessory identification on form. For maintained, visual check for illumination of sign. Then for circuit under test, isolate and check lamps are on. If lamp not on .. note to check both lamp and battery condition in addition to the usual checks (visual, cpc continuity, etc) for that accessory. Worth taking safety glasses/portable vac/waste bag with you (and don't swallow any of the flies!).

Depends if it's out of hours or in use during inspection (I'd guess the latter, so one circuit at a time (even if you have additional help)). If it's going to be in use (particularly if it's something like a cinema) then try to get an idea of the availability of each section of the complex.

Make it clear whether your contract covers rectification or just reporting of problems. A carefully worded contract covering extra time costs (outside of your control) should be considered (section/room not available when previously agreed that it would be). You may want to have the discussion about one off inspection versus ongoing inspection/maintenance contract as well.
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #9
Thanks boys your both gems. !!
 
H

hazelm

Hi Paul.m

Do you know from where the HSE book may be obtained, please?
 

i=p/u

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Arms
yh just knock off mcbs at a time that suits the business, i.e, i done a Chinese once and the best time that suited me was 8am too 12 when they opened , change any blackened lamps and checked indication of battery charging and cleaned plastic covers.

there was no form of identification on fittings and no log book present.. easy money
 

i=p/u

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Arms
[FONT=Arial,Helvetica,Geneva,Swiss,SunSans-Regular]TESTING AND LOG BOOK[/FONT][FONT=Arial,Helvetica,Geneva,Swiss,SunSans-Regular]
The Fire Precautions (Workplace) Regulations 1997 require that appropriate testing is performed to maintain compliance of the system. The system should include adequate facilities for testing and recording the system condition. These need to be appropriate for the specific site and should be considered as part of the system design. Discussions with the user or system designer should identify:
- The calibre and reliability of staff available to do the testing
- The level of difficulty in performing the test
- If discharge tests need to be done outside normal working hours, or phased so only alternate luminaires are tested in buildings that are permanently occupied
[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial,Helvetica,Geneva,Swiss,SunSans-Regular]The testing requirements in the code of practice are:
• Function test
All emergency luminaires should be tested be breaking the supply to them and checking that they operate satisfactorily.
The supply must then be restored and the charging indicators must be seen to be operating correctly. This test must be performed at least once per month and the results logged
• Discharge test
The luminaires must be tested for their full rated duration period and checked for satisfactory operation. The supply must then be restored and the charging indicators rechecked. This test must be performed at least annually and the results logged
[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial,Helvetica,Geneva,Swiss,SunSans-Regular]Note: BS 5266-1: 2005 allows a one hour test to be performed as an alternative every six months for the first 3 years of the system, but the guidance document to the Fire Precaution Regulations calls for the annual test at all stages of equipment life.[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial,Helvetica,Geneva,Swiss,SunSans-Regular]MANUAL TESTING[/FONT][FONT=Arial,Helvetica,Geneva,Swiss,SunSans-Regular]
If manual testing is utilised, the following points should be considered:
[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial,Helvetica,Geneva,Swiss,SunSans-Regular]-[/FONT][FONT=Arial,Helvetica,Geneva,Swiss,SunSans-Regular]Is a single switch to be used? Unless the whole building is to be switched off, a separate switch should be used for each final circuit. As the feed to non-maintained circuits must be taken from the switch this will probably mean that the building will have to be walked around twice, once to check the luminaires and once to check that they are recharging[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial,Helvetica,Geneva,Swiss,SunSans-Regular]-[/FONT][FONT=Arial,Helvetica,Geneva,Swiss,SunSans-Regular]Are luminaires to be individually switched? In practice, only a single walk around the building will be needed. However, the test switches could spoil the décor of the building and they must be of a type that is tamper proof.[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial,Helvetica,Geneva,Swiss,SunSans-Regular]After the tests, the performance of the luminaires must be logged.[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial,Helvetica,Geneva,Swiss,SunSans-Regular]COMMISSIONING CERTIFICATE[/FONT][FONT=Arial,Helvetica,Geneva,Swiss,SunSans-Regular]
BS5266 Pt 1: 2005 and the European Standard both require written declarations of compliance to be available on site for inspection. These consist of:
[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial,Helvetica,Geneva,Swiss,SunSans-Regular]1.[/FONT][FONT=Arial,Helvetica,Geneva,Swiss,SunSans-Regular]Installation quality.
IEE regulations must have been conformed with and non-maintained fittings fed from the final circuit of the normal lighting in each, as required in BS 5266
[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial,Helvetica,Geneva,Swiss,SunSans-Regular]2.[/FONT][FONT=Arial,Helvetica,Geneva,Swiss,SunSans-Regular]Photometric performance.
Evidence of compliance with light levels has to be supplied by the system designer. Photometric tests for Cooper Lighting and Security luminaires are performed at BSI and spacing data is registered by the ICEL scheme. Therefore copies of the spacing data in this catalogue provide the verification required.
[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial,Helvetica,Geneva,Swiss,SunSans-Regular]3.[/FONT][FONT=Arial,Helvetica,Geneva,Swiss,SunSans-Regular]Declaration of a satisfactory test of operation.
A log of all system tests and results must be maintained. System log books, with commissioning forms, testing forms and instructions are available from Cooper Lighting and Security.
[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial,Helvetica,Geneva,Swiss,SunSans-Regular]MAINTENANCE[/FONT][FONT=Arial,Helvetica,Geneva,Swiss,SunSans-Regular]
Finally, to ensure that the system remains at full operational status, essential servicing should be defined. This normally would be performed as part of the testing routine, but in the case of consumable items such as replacement lamps, spares should be provided for immediate use.
[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial,Helvetica,Geneva,Swiss,SunSans-Regular]AUTOMATIC TEST SYSTEMS[/FONT][FONT=Arial,Helvetica,Geneva,Swiss,SunSans-Regular]
If the costs of an engineer time and the disruption caused by manual testing are excessive, automatic systems should be considered. Different formats are available to match particular site requirements. Cooper Lighting and Security offer two alternative testing systems:
[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial,Helvetica,Geneva,Swiss,SunSans-Regular]• EasiCheck™
Particularly suited to medium to large sized installations, EasiCheck™ is a versatile addressable emergency lighting system that uses a central control panel to perform automatic test schedules, initiate manual tests and download event logs and test reports. It is available for use with both self-contained luminaires and central power systems. EasiCheck™ continuously monitors the emergency circuit, reporting faults as soon as they occur. Up to 63 panels can be networked together, ensuring EasiCheck™ can be utilised in the largest of projects of up to 15,750 emergency luminaires. It also has advanced software options for PC monitoring and control.
[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial,Helvetica,Geneva,Swiss,SunSans-Regular]• Intellem
Designed for use with self-contained emergency luminaires, Intellem is a stand alone self-test system for small to medium sized installations. Intellem is available in two options. In the basic format, Self Check, the testing module self calibrates and carries out testing at predetermined intervals. Faults are precisely reported by an audible alarm and the flashing sequence of the LED indicator. The enhanced Intellem Infra-Red option adds the benefits of flexible test set up, luminaire status interrogation and initiation of manual tests, all via a hand held programmer. Both options also continuously monitor the emergency luminaires, reporting faults as soon as they occur.
[/FONT]
 

i=p/u

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Arms
im getting good at this electr4ical stuff topquerk, what ya think? another ten years and engineer 54 be ringing for advice
 
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im getting good at this electr4ical stuff topquerk, what ya think? another ten years and engineer 54 be ringing for advice
I almost spilt my beer laughing at that :rofl:

Must say that you have come a long way since joining the forum mate, well done.
 
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