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Thanks for that I did forget until the Electrician mentioned. I think he mentioned Aico smoke detectors. Hallway, Landing, Kitchen, Living Room. I need to think about the home alarm as well - totally forgot its best to do it all at once!

I mentiond Part P as thats what when I was getting a kitchen fitted and a new cooker point was needed is what my kitchen fitter said I need to make sure the electrican had as a registration.
generally a smoke detector in the hall , landing and heat detector in the Kitchen is the norm...you can go full hog and have them in the bedrooms and sitting room as well But this will soon add more cost to the job..
many intruder alarms are wireless now and can generally be fitted in less than a day.
 
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Simon47

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Arms
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I think he mentioned Aico smoke detectors. Hallway, Landing, Kitchen, Living Room. I need to think about the home alarm as well - totally forgot its best to do it all at once!
Aico are good units - but hardwire them. IMO radio is for when you can't hardwire, hardwired is better - except for the inexplicable fact that Aico decided to make some features only work over radio. Bear in mind that the radio modules for Aico kit cost about the same as the detector heads - so going radio puts the cost up considerably.
On their website, they have a lot of advice to help you chose the number and type of detectors to fit. Of course, as house differ in arrangement, each will have different requirements. The basic minimum is a smoke detector on each floor - typically hallway and upstairs landing. You may want a heat (& CO if there's gas appliances) detector in the kitchen, you may want a heat detector in the garage.
While it's not mandatory for your own house, in a rented house it a legal requirement for a CO alarm in any habitable room with a solid fuel burning appliance.
Last year I renewed/upgraded the detector in a one bedroom flat - probably overkill but smoke in the vestibule, heat&CO in the kitchen, and heat in the garage underneath, and a test/locate/silence switch. What was most annoying is that I'd managed to get a cable from the existing smoke location to the kitchen when the ceiling was brought down by a water leak upstairs, and I could cable from the CU to the garage, but I had to add two radio modules to link them which added (from memory) something like 50% to the cost of the units.
I'm thinking of swapping the heat detector for a heat&CO as there's a gas boiler in the garage - I have somewhere else I can use the heat detector. I initially didn't fit CO due to the risk of false alarms from car exhaust fumes - still not sure about that, but the guys that do the gas safety checks always check if there's a CO alarm (there's a free-standing battery one so they can tick the box).
... my kitchen fitter said I need to make sure the electrican had as a registration.
As I mentioned above, it's one of the options you have available to you. TBH, it will almost certainly be cheaper to use a scheme member than to go down the self notification route.
many intruder alarms are wireless now and can generally be fitted in less than a day.
As above, if there's the chance to hardwire then hardwire. Wireless options all have drawbacks, and in principle are all susceptible to jamming - possibly with no warning for long enough for someone to get in and get out.
 

JLeague

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DIY
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #33
Aico are good units - but hardwire them. IMO radio is for when you can't hardwire, hardwired is better - except for the inexplicable fact that Aico decided to make some features only work over radio. Bear in mind that the radio modules for Aico kit cost about the same as the detector heads - so going radio puts the cost up considerably.
On their website, they have a lot of advice to help you chose the number and type of detectors to fit. Of course, as house differ in arrangement, each will have different requirements. The basic minimum is a smoke detector on each floor - typically hallway and upstairs landing. You may want a heat (& CO if there's gas appliances) detector in the kitchen, you may want a heat detector in the garage.
While it's not mandatory for your own house, in a rented house it a legal requirement for a CO alarm in any habitable room with a solid fuel burning appliance.
Last year I renewed/upgraded the detector in a one bedroom flat - probably overkill but smoke in the vestibule, heat&CO in the kitchen, and heat in the garage underneath, and a test/locate/silence switch. What was most annoying is that I'd managed to get a cable from the existing smoke location to the kitchen when the ceiling was brought down by a water leak upstairs, and I could cable from the CU to the garage, but I had to add two radio modules to link them which added (from memory) something like 50% to the cost of the units.
I'm thinking of swapping the heat detector for a heat&CO as there's a gas boiler in the garage - I have somewhere else I can use the heat detector. I initially didn't fit CO due to the risk of false alarms from car exhaust fumes - still not sure about that, but the guys that do the gas safety checks always check if there's a CO alarm (there's a free-standing battery one so they can tick the box).

As I mentioned above, it's one of the options you have available to you. TBH, it will almost certainly be cheaper to use a scheme member than to go down the self notification route.

As above, if there's the chance to hardwire then hardwire. Wireless options all have drawbacks, and in principle are all susceptible to jamming - possibly with no warning for long enough for someone to get in and get out.
Thankyou for the full reply.

I am going to get the AICO smoke alarms wired in - but now I have to factor in costs for a new alarm as well - I was thinking having an alarm system that messages my phone if the alarm has gone off.

I didn't budget for a new alarm system so will need to see what I can achieve. In my old house I had a texecom fitted that had an auto dialler after unfortunately been robbed twice - both times the same guy!
 

Midwest

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Arms
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There's Nest alarms for that, and I think Aico has added a gateway device for some of their products.

Place I work, has a basic interlinked system for some residents. In the last few weeks, we've had several false activations of alarms. Took the head of one unit on Saturday. When I was messing around with it in the office, fly fell out of it.

So with that in mind, I would install a system that not susceptible to such false activations, as Aico suggests. But their Smartlink & Radiolink products aren't cheap.

I would also invest in a remote control switch (Aico) as suggested by @Simon47 , to identify the alarm that's activated.
 

ipf

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Mentor
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It used to be part P but that was done away with as other members have said - it is now just approved. Even the c&g qualification is no longer called part p but instead it’s call building regs. Notifiable works (not called part p) go to the LABC either through the scam/scheme or directly (at an additional cost) - because the old school part p sparks don’t need to update to the latest building regs cert, they don’t always know this.... the only requirement is to have 18th edition certs. Hope that clears things up, or have I thrown a grenade??
We're going somewhere when we start calling Part P 'old school'..:)
 
We're going somewhere when we start calling Part P 'old school'..:)
old school is pre partP when an electrician was just a good old electrician

non of this modern domestic installer carp
 

ipf

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old school is pre partP when an electrician was just a good old electrician

non of this modern domestic installer carp
Proper old school...…….
Brace 'n bit for drilling joists, hammer and rawldrills for fixings, T bar for pyro, Avo and wind up megger, plum bob...…..
 

Simon47

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And an apprentice to give the ball-ache jobs to - like drilling holes with the rawldrill.
Mind you, most of that's before my time - they'd invented carbide tipped masonry bits and hammer drills by the time I was allowed to use such tools. I recall dad used to have a tin of asbestos stuff that you mixed with water to plug awkward holes, and lengths of the original Rawl fibre plugs that you cut a length off - in some ways better than the fixed length plugs we use these days.
And I have Dad's Avo downstairs - I was careful not to let that get "cleared out" when he died. I can remember being allowed to use it "a lot of years ago".
 
I recall dad used to have a tin of asbestos stuff that you mixed with water to plug awkward holes
That was amazing stuff ! Rawl Plastic is was called... and it was traditional to spit in it to moisten... I can't believe so many of us are still alive !
 
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