Discuss How much do electricians charge? in the Electrical Forum area at ElectriciansForums.net

L

Lewiselectric

Welcome to ElectriciansForums.net - The American Electrical Advice Forum
Head straight to the main forums to chat by click here:  American Electrical Advice Forum

Hi guys. i'm a young electrician just starting out in the south east of England (not London) and I've just finished a job and not sure what to charge. I've spent around 30/35 hours there, testing and inspecting wiring before altering an existed ring, fitting new dado trunking, pulled in several CAT5s for new data points and lots of other little bit's he's asked me to do over the last 2/3 weeks. I'm just double checking how much most electricians charge as I don't want to over or under charge the guy. Thanks.
 
SuperlecDirect - ElectriciansForums.net Electrical Suppliers
This official sponsor may provide discounts for members
Aico 3000
telectrix

telectrix

-
Mentor
Esteemed
Arms
up here £25 - £35 per hour is the range, down there i imagine it;s more like £45 per hour.generally for jobs of this amount of hours, you can maybe drop the rate by a %.
 
davesparks

davesparks

-
Mentor
Esteemed
Arms
Something around 35-45 per hour would be normal I think. But you should work out for yourself how much you need to charge, your overheads and other costs will be different to other people's.

Also you really should have the hourly rate agreed, ideally in writing, before you start the job, that way there can be no arguments (well they can try).
Also try not to let a job which is being done on an hourly rate go on for weeks without invoicing, you'll soon get yourself into financial difficulties that way. Agree before you start on a job like this that you will be invoicing at the end of each week.
 
buzzlightyear

buzzlightyear

-
Esteemed
Arms
approx. £35 is a going rated if you are self employed with out the outlay , £25 if retired £10 for stacking shelves £ 5 for newspaper boys .
 
L

Lewiselectric

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #5
thanks for the replies. I was thinking £25 per hour to be honest, so I think that's what I'll invoice him for. And good point Dave, I really need to get this invoice over today cos i'm getting a bit skint lol
 
telectrix

telectrix

-
Mentor
Esteemed
Arms
thanks for the replies. I was thinking £25 per hour to be honest, so I think that's what I'll invoice him for. And good point Dave, I really need to get this invoice over today cos i'm getting a bit skint lol
£25 is way too cheap. you must have overheads of around £150/week so "
£25/ hour will leave you with £850 wages. and don't forget to allow for all the hours at home doing certs. and paperwork. days with no work, and allow for 40 weeks in any one year, so your annual wages would be £850 x 40 = £34,000 for something like 60 hours a week.
 
Mike Johnson

Mike Johnson

-
Esteemed
Arms
And the fuel used to get to the job and wear and tear on the vehicle, office paper, ink, pens and other consumables often forgotten, but do come out of your bottom line.
 
Baddegg

Baddegg

-
Esteemed
Arms
Supporter
Patron
At £25 an hour down here mate you’ll be the busiest fool around....go higher you may not get all the jobs but you’ll still be making the same dough with half the stress....the only person who can really answer this is you....get ya self out there and you’ll work it all out mate and good luck to ya 😁
 
snowhead

snowhead

-
Mentor
The problem with charging too low is the customer may want you back for more and you're stuck at that price and may recommend you, as it's cheap, to others who would then expect work at the same price.
And as above, you suddenly become very busy but not rich.
 
P

pc1966

Esteemed
Arms
Supporter
As already covered don't undercharge for your time as its not your pay: its your business income from which you end up paying some to yourself (after overheads and tax man has taken their slices).

It is tricky if you have started a job without an agreed payment. Some like to pay by time, others by job outcome, but you need to get it agreed early so no arguments or bad feeling later.

Also mentioned but to be reinforced here - invoice early and at sensible intervals. On big jobs try not to go beyond 1 month without settling out what is due, they will take a month to pay you if lucky!

There used to be a roofer around here that did a great job at reasonable prices but I had to chase him for over a month for an invoice to actually pay him. No longer in business sadly :(
 
Taylortwocities

Taylortwocities

-
Esteemed
Arms
It also depends on the length of the job. When I started I charged not much and hour and did every job that came in.
That way I ended up with 4 jobs a day that took an hour each. The rest of the time was traveling to and from, tools in and out, paying cheques in to the bank (none of the old ladies had cash, so it was cheque....)

After a while it dawned on me that trying to fill the day with little jobs for not that much was a mugs game. So concentrate on jobs that are minimum half a day. Save the one hour jobs for fill in, and chrge 2 hoursminimum.
Best to find large projects, new builds where you have many days on one site.

Don't be scared to charge too much. There's a huge pent up demand due to lockdown.
Lots of the European competition have gone home and cant get back.
 
Mike Johnson

Mike Johnson

-
Esteemed
Arms
Set yourself a minimum charge, no use going to a half hour job and not even getting the cost of the fuel to get there.
 
Electrical2Go - Online Electrical Supplier
This official sponsor may provide discounts for members

Reply to How much do electricians charge? in the Electrical Forum area at ElectriciansForums.net

Bulk Workwear - Clothing Suppliers for the Whole Forum Network
This official sponsor may provide discounts for members
Top Bottom