Discuss Hyro power question?? in the Hyrdoelectric Power Forum area at ElectriciansForums.net

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Morgan keith

Hi guys, I know this forum is predominantly for solar PV but we've been asked to look at a hydro job (our first). Looks reasonably straight forward but the customer wants the 1 hydro generator to connect to 2 different connection/supply points? Is this possible or not? As I know with PV it doesn't work. Further more, 1 supply is split phase and the other is still being built but can either be single phase or 3 phase. Any help would be appreciated
 

Worcester

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In theory you could, however the control system will be custom and very expensive. This is not standard practice, also seeing as the source is a single source it would be very unlikely that he could claim multiple FIT installations from the same generator.

If you think about it, it's not really much different from a three phase inverter... - In fact Eltec's three phase solar inverters are actually 3 x single phase inverters in a single box- however it does rely on three seperate strings, and manages the phase balancing

Sounds to me like he's either being mechanistic thinking he can claim higher rates, or else there are grid conenction limitiations. Micro-Hydro take quite a while to go through planning, with environmental impact studies and the actual construction, so his new 3 phase will probably be installed by the time this got commissioned!

If it is so that he can use the power himself across multiple sites, he may be better making sure the new supply can cope with the load requirments at both suites and then sub-metering one himself, that way they will both benfit from the power that the Hydro generates :)

Hope that helps.
 
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Morgan keith

Thanks Worcester that's helpful. Running a sub main did cross my mind. Planning permission has been granted for the hydro to go right next to where the 3 phase supply will be but the other building that'll have a greater consumption is about 1km away so not sure if it'll be worth it economically but they seem to really want it connected to the building with the greater consumption! Might try work out the savings against the cost of running 1KM of 95mm cable and that'll prob scare them off!! Just another question-I take it the max volt drop on hydro isn't 1% like PV is?
 

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It's down to where you put the G59 relay - see this thread, http://www.electriciansforums.net/photovoltaic-solar-panels-green-energy-forum/61435-over-voltage-problem.html#post583345

It also depends upom what equipment you are using on the Hydro, is it an AC Alternator / Generator, or is it DC with an inverter?, If inverter using a G%9 relay it doesn;t need to be tyoe certified as the relay will handle the grid connection.

The 1% is to stop overvolatge problems with the generator connection.

If you connect to the grid at the new incoming, then because the long run is a supply cable to another building (sub-main) you could use the 3% rule. :) Else if you grid connected at the remote building the above linked post could also help you, however be careful with the voltage at the generator end.

Over and under voltaghe can cause all sorts of probelms to exsiting equipment - hence the massive growth in commercial Voltage Optimisation kit.
 
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