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hi just done a extension and full re wire to the house had building inspector come round and say you need an extractor what goes outside and vents 60 litres

the customer only has a charcoal filter and that was only on the plans

so my question is do you need one or is charcoal 1 sufice
 
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S

Spudnik

You will need to fit an extractor im afraid.

Any kitchen that is renewed must have extraction to the outside air, so you can either duct the kitchen extractor or fit one in the wall to the outside.
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #3
You will need to fit an extractor im afraid.

Any kitchen that is renewed must have extraction to the outside air, so you can either duct the kitchen extractor or fit one in the wall to the outside.

ta iv never been told that apart from today

its a shame though as they only place we can put it will look odd
 
L

lister

You will need to fit an extractor im afraid.

Any kitchen that is renewed must have extraction to the outside air, so you can either duct the kitchen extractor or fit one in the wall to the outside.

where's it say that in the brb then, or are you quoting building regs, i ask so as that i can show my kitchen fitters, i have to say though may a kitchen refit have i wired only a charcole extractor, usually because there on an internal wall and don't want ceilings touched.
 
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  • #6
where's it say that in the brb then, or are you quoting building regs, i ask so as that i can show my kitchen fitters, i have to say though may a kitchen refit have i wired only a charcole extractor, usually because there on an internal wall and don't want ceilings touched.

as iv said thats all we do unless customer asks for a vented one which isnt often

we had the chance to put in a extractor as the ceelings where down as it was anew build but to late now
 
S

Spudnik

yes, new build fair enough, but cant find any mention of retro fitting on refits (as per jasons6930's quote)
Sorry, meant to add that if BC were involved.

Mind you, im not so sure that you still shouldnt fit one.

If the regs are being followed then even renewing your bathroom suite should be notified, but thats way off topic.

Easiest thing to do is give them or your scheme provider a quick call.
 
hi just done a extension and full re wire to the house had building inspector come round and say you need an extractor what goes outside and vents 60 litres

the customer only has a charcoal filter and that was only on the plans

so my question is do you need one or is charcoal 1 sufice
There's always ways round these things if asthetic is an issue.Any kitchen I've done in the past 10years always had to have one fitted.It could be boxed in,maybe on top of the cupboards.60litres means a 6inch fan.They make reducers from round to rectangle which can be hidden if there is coving.I have also seen them fitted inside cupboards.And I have also seen one in a fancy kitchen fitted at worktop level,drawing the air down,ducted vertically to kick space,then flexiducted to the outside.
They also do not necessarily need to be a part of the extracter hood and can be a totally independant,can be a wall,ceiling,or window mounted.It is the room itself that needs this ventilation.
Hopefully this will give you some options to think about.
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #11
There's always ways round these things if asthetic is an issue.Any kitchen I've done in the past 10years always had to have one fitted.It could be boxed in,maybe on top of the cupboards.60litres means a 6inch fan.They make reducers from round to rectangle which can be hidden if there is coving.I have also seen them fitted inside cupboards.And I have also seen one in a fancy kitchen fitted at worktop level,drawing the air down,ducted vertically to kick space,then flexiducted to the outside.
They also do not necessarily need to be a part of the extracter hood and can be a totally independant,can be a wall,ceiling,or window mounted.It is the room itself that needs this ventilation.
Hopefully this will give you some options to think about.

that helps a little

the only place we could put it is next to the door on the wall which will b hidden by the tv once he gets that up

ta for the help
 

acvc

-
Arms
Sorry this is a week late or so ......

Are you guys categorically saying that such extraction is mandatory? If so where exactly, is it in Part F of the Building Regs? I know there are recommended extraction rates and/or openings proportional to floor area.

I'm only asking as it's got me panicking. I've got an on-site assessment coming up shortly and am using my own house, the kitchen refitted but can't afford to complete so ventilation provided by double external doors in the kitchen. Even a hood-filter is not sufficient then?

Many thanks for any guidance provided.
 
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S

Spudnik

I would say that if the kitchen is partly done, but all the electrical installation is complete then you could always inform the inspector if he asks, that its an ongoing project.

Dont offer the information. Wait to be asked.

To be honest he will probably be more interested in the electrical side of things.
 

acvc

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Arms
OK thanks for that Jason. I will definitely stick to the 'work in progress' line. Do you think the inspector would be expecting to see the fcu in place? I suppose if i get time it wouldn't do any harm to put it in place anyway ....... but then that might draw his attention to the whole issue!

Thanks.
 
C

city spark

wrong place for this question but you maybe able to help is there any regs to do with socket outlet position in kitchen near gas hob and also is the distance from sink to socket outlet 1mtr thanks in advance for your help
 
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