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Discuss Low current device on lighting circuit in the DIY Electrical Forum area at ElectriciansForums.net

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I've had a new smart door lock fitted to the front door. In order to get best usage I need to run a small electronic device called a bridge which will link this lock to the internet via bluetooth and wifi. The bridge requires AC power and is deigned to be plugged in to a socket. It needs to be located within 10ft of the lock and I have no sockets near nor any chance of running a new socket. I do have a light switch and a light that I could potentially use.

The device has 2 pins designed for North American Socket. It requires 0.1A 50-60Hz and between 110 to 240v. It needs to run permanently and never needs to be turned off. It's a small device and I'm happy to pull apart and put into some kind of junction box.

Questions:
1. Is there any reason why this wouldn't work? 0.1A is much lower than any light but i presume the device just pulls the current it needs?

2. Should i connect using the wires to the switch or to the wires to the light?
 
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Baddegg

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Not in anyway saying what your proposing is doable but might not have a permanent line at the switch anyway mate...
 

telectrix

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no problem with connecting to lighting circuit. you need to find if the neutral is at the light or at the switch. then your device needs a permanent L and a N. it's more common to have both at the light rather than at the switch. is the light a standard rose and pendant? can you post a pic. of the wiring at the light and at the switch?
 

Wilko

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Hi - likely the switch has L and two switched L, but I couldn’t see an N in the pic. You’ll need both L and N for a separate load from the light.
 

Spoon

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What does the manual say about fusing for the bridge?
If it's intended to be plugged into a socket then what size fuse is meant to go in the plug?
 

Taylortwocities

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You have a problem.

The switch doesn’t have a neutral, the light doesn’t have a permanent live. You need both to power the module.

The switch appears to be part of a two-way circuit, so there may not even be a permanent live there!
The lighting circuit is an old type. It was then done by the cables being connected by a junction box hidden.....somewhere.

You need to investigate another power source.
Sorry
 
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Thanks for your comments. It is a 2 way light switch. I opened up the bridge to see what was inside as I figured i'd be doing some soldering anyway. Picture attached. No fuse. The 2 prongs attach directly to the board.

Any other ideas? There is a cable close going to an external floodlight that is permanently on (the sensor is on the unit for switching). I could cut that and put this board in a junction box there?

IMG_20190803_133706.jpg
 

Taylortwocities

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There is a cable close going to an external floodlight that is permanently on (the sensor is on the unit for switching).
That should provide you with the permanent live and neutral. What does your test meter tell you?
What size fuse protects that circuit? Is there an FCU or something or does it just feed from another circuit. Which circuit?
 
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