Advertisement - Content continues below
Advertisement - Content continues below

Discuss low power 110v~240v device on a construction site in the Electrical Forum area at ElectriciansForums.net

Welcome to ElectriciansForums.net - The American Electrical Advice Forum
Head straight to the main forums to chat by click here:  American Electrical Advice Forum

PoE details:
Input: AC 100v~240v- 50/60Hz 0.3A max
Output: DC 24v 0.5A

PoE injector is used to convert mains AC into DC and power IP devices such as CCTV cameras and Wifi APs. These devices are designed for worldwide sale and are also widely used in the US and alike on 110v supplies. The only thing that makes this compatible I believe for the UK is the regional mains lead:

Supplied lead:

Input socket: UK Plug 5A fuse (BS1363)
Output socket: IEC C5 2.5A
flex: 3G 0.75mm2

I cannot find a 110v 16a commando style connector to IEC C5 probably for a good reason.

My initial thought was that I could simply take a 110v flex, cut the UK plug off and connect in a terminal block. However, this means I'm removing the 5Amp fuse from the circuit also there is a difference in the site provided input flex 1.5mm2 to the 0.75mm2 on the original flex??

How can I make this compliant and where or who could I go to get this passed as safe? If all goes well I will probably eventually need 100's of these but need a prototype run of 1o for the moment.

Where should I go to get these made or certified?

mockup:
http://i.Upload the image directly to the thread.com/Liqiz1i.jpg
 
Advertisement - Content continues below

SparkyChick

Mod
Mentor
Arms
Esteemed
If you're having many of these on one site, then you may be better off looking at PoE network switches capable of supplying lots of devices whilst providing the networking :)
 

Lucien Nunes

-
Mentor
Arms
Esteemed
Fit a unswiched fuse spur
That would only give single-pole fusing. Site supplies are 55-0-55 CT-E. Both live conductors are lines, so any fusing must be double-pole. In this respect they are different from ordinary 110V / 120V USA supplies which have a grounded neutral like our 230V.

The question is whether any fusing is required at all. The unit is probably designed to be used with an unfused plug on both EU 230V 16A circuits and USA 120V 15A circuits. If so, it might be practical to make the connection between the external cable and the C5 moulded cordset using a couple of DIN rail mounting fused terminals.
 
Interesting one, the tricky part is protecting the IEC C5 which is rated at 2.5A max, they're usually molded onto a cable so that will probably be low current too. The fuse is to protect the cable and connector, not the device.

I'd think about using a Wagobox Light with an inline fuse/connector block. Wire the 16A connector and cable to the C5 via the block and stick a 2A fuse in the carrier. The Wagobox would keep fingers off the terminals and has suitable BS/EN markings. Lucien makes a good point about the 55-0-55 supply so maybe a two inline fuses would be worth considering.
 
Last edited:

Lucien Nunes

-
Mentor
Arms
Esteemed
As you're suggesting SP fusing, are you thinking that it's only needed to protect against L-L faults / overcurrent, and that L-E faults will be adequately covered by the supply OCPD?
 
As you're suggesting SP fusing, are you thinking that it's only needed to protect against L-L faults / overcurrent, and that L-E faults will be adequately covered by the supply OCPD?
No, I agree that it would need 2 fuses to demonstrate adequate protection against any single fault. Posts/edits are getting crossed in the conversation:)
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #10
Cheers for the feedback surprised how active this forum is.

Could this be added FX0380 | Bulgin 10A Inline Fuse Holder for 5 x 20mm Fuse, 250V | RS Components - https://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/products/0414601 in addition, to the "inline fuse/connector" to meet fuse on each conductor requirement?

Assuming this would meet requirements who or where could I go to get this passed as safe to use on site?
That looks fine, thing to look for is UL94-V0 in the spec. Some fuseholders are UL94-VHB which are a fire waiting to happen. They are only rated at 50V but if they're inaccessible in a box or heatshrink they're good for 250V.

Not sure you'd need to get it passed anywhere, maybe check the MIs of the device but so long as the supply conforms to BS7671 I'd have thought you're covered.

Adapter is interesting, they claim 10A but IEC C5 is 2.5A max, I'd take that spec with a pinch of salt. With suitable fuses it should be fine but I'd ask CPC for a look at the makers certification first.
 

Lucien Nunes

-
Mentor
Arms
Esteemed
I'm not a great fan of those inline fuseholders for portable gear. Any tension on the cables causes them to break contact as it pulls against the spring, so the options for tethering them are a bit limited. For a throw-down power box I prefer stuff to be rigidly screwed together.
Another option would be two grid fuseholder modules in a 1G plate.

Consider making it extra-simple to change the external power cable, so that you don't have units out of use awaiting technical maintenance due to damaged cables. Would an IEC 60309 appliance inlet coupler be practical, so that the cable is a separate entity and any site extension cable can be attached? That would lock you to one voltage though. An IEC C14 inlet inside on the terminal box, with some means to get the cable in through the outer box without removing the plug?
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #13
Not sure you'd need to get it passed anywhere, maybe check the MIs of the device but so long as the supply conforms to BS7671 I'd have thought you're covered.
I'm not a spark, I'm happy to pay someone to configure these for me, what cert could I ask for if there is such a thing? I also assume these will need to be checked on site periodically? Which is when PaC testing has just come to mind?

Wouldan IEC 60309 appliance inlet coupler be practical, so that the cable is a separate entity and any site extension cable can be attached?
I was thinking of a surface mount socket, however the box may loose it's weather proofing and live terminals would be in the outer box which is something I want to avoid. As these convertors will be relatively inexpensive I can provide the site with backups to swap out should there be a fault.
 
If the power supply has internal overload protection, then is there a need to add in line fusing?
As mentioned, loads of these units are likely fed by unfused schuko plugs protected by b16 breaker. So maybe get specs for power supply for more info first.
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #15
@Bellendian
I think is was due to the C5 cables not being rated for 16A?

I would want these to be generic so they can be inetAlins on any site running 110v.

I guess adding the fuses inline won't harm anything, I would much rather have these devices installed where nobody later down the line can throw rocks at it.

I would still like to know what sort of certificate of installation I could get for this off someone qualified?
 
uHeat Banner - Forum Discount Available
This official sponsor may provide discounts for members
Advertisement - Content continues below

Reply to low power 110v~240v device on a construction site in the Electrical Forum area at ElectriciansForums.net

Bulk Workwear - Clothing Suppliers for the Whole Forum Network
This official sponsor may provide discounts for members
Advertisement - Content continues below
Advertisement - Content continues below

Electrical Forum

Welcome to the Electrical Forum at ElectriciansForums.net. The friendliest electrical forum online. General electrical questions and answers can be found in the electrical forum.
Advertisement - Content continues below
Top Bottom