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Hi,

I am building a motorized easel for large format paintings that do not exceed 100 lbs; average probably more like 50 lbs max. My rough 3D diagram does not show the motor or pullies, etc, but I hope you can get an idea of where these things would go. Motor mounts on the bottom. Cables will raise and lower the central panel via pulleys up top. I purchased a 2500 lb capacity winch motor from Amazon, but it looks like it can only operate via 12v battery; and the instructions also say it should not be used to lift things vertically. Can anyone advise me re: what kind of motor to buy and where to buy one? I only know basic electrical stuff, so please don't throw advanced technical specs at me.:) Any guidance would be much appreciated! Thank youeasel 2up_v3a.jpg
 

Pete999

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Hi,

I am building a motorized easel for large format paintings that do not exceed 100 lbs; average probably more like 50 lbs max. My rough 3D diagram does not show the motor or pullies, etc, but I hope you can get an idea of where these things would go. Motor mounts on the bottom. Cables will raise and lower the central panel via pulleys up top. I purchased a 2500 lb capacity winch motor from Amazon, but it looks like it can only operate via 12v battery; and the instructions also say it should not be used to lift things vertically. Can anyone advise me re: what kind of motor to buy and where to buy one? I only know basic electrical stuff, so please don't throw advanced technical specs at me.:) Any guidance would be much appreciated! Thank youView attachment 52089
Sorry, don't mean to be dismissive, but did you not research the motor required beforehand, or was it an impulsive buy, far to good a price to miss?? A chance buy maybe??
 

westward10

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Only having basic electrical knowledge is going to be a drawback when suggesting a motor type, your available supply and how to forward and reverse it.
 
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Sorry, don't mean to be dismissive, but did you not research the motor required beforehand, or was it an impulsive buy, far to good a price to miss?? A chance buy maybe??
I researched numerous motors, but since I've never worked with reversible motors before, I failed to understand all the nuances. The manufacturer doesn't tell you the motor should not be used to hoist vertically until you get the instructions (fine print) with the package. This is not an issue, however, I will simply return it. Thanks
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Only having basic electrical knowledge is going to be a drawback when suggesting a motor type, your available supply and how to forward and reverse it.
I would like to get an idea of how complicated this might be; and if too complicated, then, I will, of course, hire an electrician. Also, I'm hoping to buy a motor that is already designed to forward and reverse, so that I wouldn't have to do any special wiring etc. Thanks
 

westward10

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The simplest solution if you are using 12v DC is a permanent magnet motor which is simply reversed through a switch to reverse the battery polarity. You are going to need some sort of gearing to lift and drop the easel though.
 
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The simplest solution if you are using 12v DC is a permanent magnet motor which is simply reversed through a switch to reverse the battery polarity. You are going to need some sort of gearing to lift and drop the easel though.
Someone suggested I use a Linear Actuator which I believe may be my best route (I wasn't familiar with them). But thank you very much for your solution.
 
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Right! But I discovered that stuff is pretty much all contained in a linear actuator. Anyway, I'm researching them now; still don't know much. Thanks again
 

darkwood

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There are many hurdles here, using standard motors requires some complex load calculations, design issues of converting rotation into straight action and also you have to consider how to control the motor to ensure it performs only what you require - using a standard motor has inherent issues of ensuring it doesn't overrun in either direction, this would require finite control and possible some form of sensors to determine position, this all add to cost and can be overly expensive for such a simple task.

As has already been mentioned here, a linear actuator is a good place to start, it can be bought for the actuation distance you require, it will cut out once in full position and only react to the opposite direction command when fully open or closed, it also has a very basic and simple control to operate it and can be supplied with a range of specified voltages a/c and d/c meaning one could run one on a battery arrangement if needed.

You are probably best pitching your request direct to the manufacturer of a linear actuator who I am sure will specify the suitable one for your needs and any additional controls available for the device, your lack of knowledge in this field is your biggest hurdle as you are going to be swamped with terms and asked specific questions that you may not be able to answer, this could end up costing you if you give the wrong info etc, you are best bringing in someone who can directly design the correct solution for you thus specifying exactly what you need, this would require onsite measurements, looking into mounting and fixing options and also power and control options, this cannot be done over the forum chat as even with the best intentions of our members to help you a small mistake in info' or even missed information could result in incorrect advice given at your cost.

It seems an interesting project and wish you well in seeing it through to completion but just heed the cautionary points I made above, also with this been an electro-mechanical moving device you will need to consider safety and do a risk assessment, last thing you want is some poor child getting crushed fingers (random example).
 
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Darkwood, I much appreciate your input on my project. I will carefully consider everything in your notes; they all make sense. Especially re: working with the manufacturer. Thank you very much!
 

Lucien Nunes

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Design the mechanics of the hoist first. From the speed and weight that you want the linear motion to handle. you can calculate the rotational speed and torque, and hence find a suitable motor / gearbox (aka gearmotor) combination. Many manufacturers provide matched sets with specified output speed and torque so you don't need to think about motor and reduction gearing as separate components. You might be able to buy the assembly with limit switches built-in too.

For the motor itself the popular reversible choices would be either AC permanent split capacitor (cheap, powered directly from AC line, fixed speed) or DC permanent magnet (variable speed possible with suitable controller, requires DC power converter). There are others.
 

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