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Discuss Neff hob with a plug - can it be hard wired? in the Electrical Appliances Forum area at ElectriciansForums.net

sctyc16

EF Member
Hello,

I had a rewire in my kitchen extension weeks ago and the electrician left a spurred hard wire for the hob in the right place before my kitchen was fitted.

The kitchen is now fitted, apart from a some appliances, and it seems my Neff induction hob has a plug socket... I just assumed it would have been a wired connection and so did everyone who quoted for the job when discussing.

Can the plug be removed and the hob connected direct to the hard wire?
How easy is it for an electrician to change the wired point into a power socket?

Thanks,
Scott
 

FLICK

Electrician's Arms
Why not remove the fused spur and change it to a single socket outlet. To me that would be the best option.
 

ferg

Electrician's Arms
Very easy to change.
It could be hard wired as long as it's fused correctly.
 

sparks_114

Regular EF Member
I would definitely go with changing the outlet to a single socket as hard wiring a plug appliance to a (presumably) 32A circuit can cause a few problems. With a socket and plug scenario at least the the fuse drops the amperage to (at least) 13A.

While talking about wiring of hobs and by extension ovens if a scenario occurs whereby a hob is hardwired while the oven has a plug then the best option would be to install a dual backbox (surface is OK space permitting) with an outlet on one side (for the hob in above example) and a single socket on the other side (for oven). Amongst others things need to also ensure the cable is of adequate size for the combined load too. Hope this also helps.

Huseyin
 

Matthewd29

Regular EF Member
It wouldn't cause any problems presumably you'd be connecting to a FCU if you were removing a plug top
 

sparks_114

Regular EF Member
It wouldn't cause any problems presumably you'd be connecting to a FCU if you were removing a plug top
That's also perfectly safe, the only (slight) issue with that is cutting moulded plugs off usually violates the warranty. The (long) way around that is to contact manufacturer / distributer and request the appliance without a plug. Thanks.
 

Midwest

Electrician's Arms
Cutting off the plug 'top' will not invalidate the manufactures warranty, in most cases. One should verify with said manufacturer to see if it does; in my experience of asking such a question, most don't care.

Edit; their are some that specify their original supply leads must be used. But thats typically, when they have a moulded female socket that is inserted into the appliance.
 
Last edited:

UNG

Forum Mentor
That's also perfectly safe, the only (slight) issue with that is cutting moulded plugs off usually violates the warranty. The (long) way around that is to contact manufacturer / distributer and request the appliance without a plug. Thanks.
Ahh that old myth, the warranty isn't violated but it does cause issues for safe isolation if a manufacturers warranty repair is needed because the manufacturers safe isolation procedure is remove plug from socket if connected to a spur then they usually require it to be disconnected / reconnected by an electrician
 

Midwest

Electrician's Arms
Ahh that old myth, the warranty isn't violated but it does cause issues for safe isolation if a manufacturers warranty repair is needed because the manufacturers safe isolation procedure is remove plug from socket if connected to a spur then they usually require it to be disconnected / reconnected by an electrician
Turn off the FCU & isolate, then cut the flex :)
 

FatAlan

Trainee
Trainee Access
I’m about to install a couple of Neff ovens and it interesting that the supply leads now consist of a socket into the oven on a 2.5 flex with bare conductors at the other end.
 

Taylortwocities

Electrician's Arms
I’m about to install a couple of Neff ovens and it interesting that the supply leads now consist of a socket into the oven on a 2.5 flex with bare conductors at the other end.
Is that a socket at the oven end? What sort?
What is the power rating of the ovens?
 

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