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Hi
I am wanting to put a couple of LED Floodlights along the front of my house and a couple more in a barn that is next to the gable end of my house (3 meters away) , the only feed I have outside is a small floodlight on the gable end , (next to the barn) this is run off the house lower light circuit .
It would be most probably be ok ( I think ) if it was only going to supply 4x 30W LED Floodlights , but someone could change that to a higher wattage later ! .

The problem I have is that the CU is in the middle of the house , so very difficult to take another feed from it .
So what I was thinking was taking a feed from the lower ring main ( a lower floor socket next to the gable end , and somehow fitting it into a 5A fused spur , using 1.5mm2 cable , then take my feed from that to the 2 light circuits outside ! .



Spike44
 

telectrix

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Arms Access
5A FCU next to socket. drill out and use black flex for floods. wiska box beside each light to join to the floodlight's pre-wired flex.
 

Spoon

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Arms Access
Welcome to the forum mate.
Does the circuit you are thinking of using have RCD protection?
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #4
5A FCU next to socket. drill out and use black flex for floods. wiska box beside each light to join to the floodlight's pre-wired flex.
Thanks for reply , yes have got some wiska boxes , the flex outside was going to be another question , what do you mean black flex , it has to be weather and uv resistant !
 

telectrix

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Arms Access
Thanks for reply , yes have got some wiska boxes , the flex outside was going to be another question , what do you mean black flex , it has to be weather and uv resistant !
yep. most flex is weather resistant, but black is better for UV resistance.
 

Paignton pete

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Arms Access
Welcome.
I think I’d be tempted to use arctic flex in your neck of the woods. Also you state barn.
Is it a farm by any change or a property out in the sticks suseptable to particular exposed weather climates?

BTW what field of electrician where you?
 

davesparks

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Arms Access
.
I think I’d be tempted to use arctic flex in your neck of the woods.
Why, I can't think of any advantage to using Arctic, and it would look terrible.
Post automatically merged:

Thanks for reply , yes have got some wiska boxes , the flex outside was going to be another question , what do you mean black flex , it has to be weather and uv resistant !
Generally black sheathed cable is more UV resistant than other colours, a tough rubber flex such as H07RNF is generally preferable for external use.
 

davesparks

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Arms Access
Parts of Yorkshire can get pretty wild in winter. They can get well below -15 degrees Celsius
That doesn't necessitate the use of Arctic flex though, the main point of Arctic flex is that it remains flexible at low temperatures which isn't a requirement of fixed installations.
H07RNF in fixed installations is rated to -30C so should be adequate, and not as ugly as blue, yellow or orange cable.
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #10
Welcome to the forum mate.
Does the circuit you are thinking of using have RCD protection?
Hi thanks for your reply , yes it will come from a RCD protected circuit
Welcome.
I think I’d be tempted to use arctic flex in your neck of the woods. Also you state barn.
Is it a farm by any change or a property out in the sticks suseptable to particular exposed weather climates?

BTW what field of electrician where you?
yes it is on open fields
Post automatically merged:

Hi thanks for your reply , yes it will come from a RCD protected circuit

yes it is on open fields
Auto elec
 

Spoon

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Arms Access
Thanks for the reply mate.
Do the floodlight have flying leads or do you wire directly to them?
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #12
Thanks for the reply mate.
Do the floodlight have flying leads or do you wire directly to them?
They are just the basic floods , will make fly leads to go into a wiska box for each of them
Post automatically merged:

Parts of Yorkshire can get pretty wild in winter. They can get well below -15 degrees Celsius
Hi , Thanks for your reply , it does get quite windy and cold but glad to say not that cold though .
Post automatically merged:

Thanks for all your replies , can I just confirm that it would not be recommended o take the feed from the lower floor light circuit has I had first mentioned ? .
 
Last edited:

Spoon

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Arms Access
Thanks for all your replies , can I just confirm that it would not be recommended o take the feed from the lower floor light circuit has I had first mentioned ? .
You are only adding 4x30W (120W total. About 0.5A) to the lighting circuit. I can't see this as a problem.... Depending on existing lights on this circuit.
 

littlespark

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Arms Access
A lot of these LED floods come with a pre wired fly lead, and some soldered in, so can’t be replaced with longer if needed.

There’s no issue adding 4 x 30W to an existing lighting circuit as long as it’s already not near overloaded.
What size is the old floodlight you’re taking down? If it’s a 200W halogen tube, I think it’ll be fine.

Also need to think how the new ones are switched? All together or individually? On PIR sensors?
 

FatAlan

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Trainee Electrician
If you can wire direct into the light you won’t need a junction box. Just try and arrange the cable so that it doesn’t run down into the light as water will get in.
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #16
Thanks everyone for posting replies to me , just one more question could I use 1.0mm2 cable for the house n barn , the barn will be SWA cable up into the barn .

cheers
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #17
Why, I can't think of any advantage to using Arctic, and it would look terrible.
Post automatically merged:



Generally black sheathed cable is more UV resistant than other colours, a tough rubber flex such as H07RNF is generally preferable for external use.
Hi

Is this the type you are are talking about : H07RN-F Type 4-Core Rubber Cable Black 1.5mm² , need 4 core for a switch on the house , just below the floods ?.
 

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