Discuss Plastic consumer units and how to code them in the Periodic Inspection Reporting & Certification area at ElectriciansForums.net

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LastManOnline

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Having been involved in NHS installs, Supermarkets, Garages, Data centres and the likes, as well as domestic, I can assure you the complexities within commercial and industrial far exceed anything found in the domestic field.
Your post came to mind last night. I was involved in faultfinding a SHEV system for a UK property company in a local supermarket. And as you state above, much more complex than domestic faultfinding.
Yes House wiring should always be completed by someone with the right skill set, but I know for a fact, that someone who has only ever dealt with house rewires would be completely out of there depth in the commercial world if involved with all aspects of an installation therein.
I could have explained myself a little better there. I served my time with a small domestic contractor. But in practice, small contractors have a finger in every pie, only have themselves to rely on and want to extract as much benefit from their apprentices as possible. So there is great experience from the getgo. I had a very varied apprenticeship. When I qualified and wanted a bit of adventure in the industrial world I spent a few years working on refineries, ships, oil rigs, generating stations, you name it. I could summarise it all in by describing it as a very long line of tray, Trunking, conduit, swa and numbered cable terminations. We called ourselves "unistrut engineers". I love Installation work. Good fun but if you were, nt part of the commission team, it was, nt technically demanding.
Today I am working again as a domestic contractor with a "finger in every pie". Last night I had an extremely demanding (but rewarding) "technical" experience. It was that idea that I was originally trying to convey in my earlier post.
By the way, you mentioned that you comlpeted your C&G course. I know of very few apprentices who did that. Respect!
 
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By the way, you mentioned that you comlpeted your C&G course. I know of very few apprentices who did that. Respect!
At the end of the 3 years, and having achieved the 236 B. A lot of companies felt you were sufficiently qualified to get out there and start earning them some money.
I did feel it was very much down to me when it came to the C cert which was considered a technical grade. I still feel the 236 although old (like me) was a well rounded qualification that when completed with an apprenticeship gave those in the trade a good start to there electrical career. These days there are to many quick fix courses with little substance and giving rise to a lot of confusion as to just how competent operatives are once they have them. Recognised and standardised quality courses, with decent tuition and multiple years to complete, combined with proper apprenticeships is the only way to achieve the right foundation towards being truly qualified. For this reason I feel quick fix wonder courses degrade our trade and are nothing short of bloody dangerous. But Im an old fart so what do I know. 🙈👍
 

LastManOnline

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At the end of the 3 years, and having achieved the 236 B. A lot of companies felt you were sufficiently qualified to get out there and start earning them some money.
I did feel it was very much down to me when it came to the C cert which was considered a technical grade.
As I mentioned, served my time with a small domestic contractor. The downside was the technical training provided. Seen as the "poorer relation", domestic contractors were obliged to send their apprentices to technical college 1 day a week only. Apprentices with bigger contractors got a 3 month block release course every year. There was a significant gap in technical training provided. As you say "it was down to me" to invest the time in keeping up with the rest which is what I did. Nightschool and personal input were required. All worth it in the end though.
Course C was on my agenda but just had too many balls to juggle at the time and it (unfortunately) never happened
 

cliffed

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I wonder how long it will be before this goes even further and we have metal MCB's, RCD's, RCBO's and main switch's, even to the extent of T&E being metal sheathed, or maybe back to metal conduit becoming compulsory.
That’s actually a good shout conduit rarely used these days & the relevant problems not using this, is causing many a problem now.
Who would ever think now, clipping T&E with metallic clips…
 

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