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Hi everyone,

I have what I'm sure is a very basic question that I would really appreciate some help on. I am a cider maker and recently purchased a new apple grinder that is manufactured in Germany and runs on 230v/50hz. I am wondering how I can use it here in the US? It came with a power supply that requires me to wire my own plug to it (not pictured below). But my question is, what do I need to do to make it functional here in America? Any and all help would be much appreciated. Thanks so much in advance,

jack
 

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James

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the rating plate says 50/60hz
220v is probably close enough for the motor to be run without problems.
you need a 220v outlet and a cable made up to connect it.
often your tumble dryer outlets are 220v if I recall?
 

Lucien Nunes

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Typical residential supplies in the USA are 120V / 240V split-phase with two hot wires and a neutral. Domestic appliances typically use one hot and neutral for 120V, but stoves, dryers, A/C etc use the two hots to supply 240V and this configuration will power your apple grinder.

You will need a 240V grounded outlet to plug the machine into; it does not matter whether the outlet has a neutral or not, as the machine won't need it, only the two hots and ground. Therefore either of the two common types of 240V receptacle, type 6 (without neutral) or type 14 (with neutral) will suit. Then you would make a cable from a matching plug, (e.g. if you have a 14-20R receptacle then a 14-20P plug) to Schuko inline coupler to fit the machine. The line and neutral terminals of the coupler will connect to the X and Y terminals of the plug. Because the inlet on the machine is non-polarised, it does not matter that both wires will be hot, instead of hot and neutral.

Larger 240V outlets such as 30A and 50A rated types used for stoves and dryers will supply the necessary power but the breaker will not offer adequate protection to the machine cable. You would need to down-rate the circuit to say 20A or add a local breaker box with a smaller outlet.

Ensure codes are met regarding ground fault protection if required.
 

Megawatt

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Typical residential supplies in the USA are 120V / 240V split-phase with two hot wires and a neutral. Domestic appliances typically use one hot and neutral for 120V, but stoves, dryers, A/C etc use the two hots to supply 240V and this configuration will power your apple grinder.

You will need a 240V grounded outlet to plug the machine into; it does not matter whether the outlet has a neutral or not, as the machine won't need it, only the two hots and ground. Therefore either of the two common types of 240V receptacle, type 6 (without neutral) or type 14 (with neutral) will suit. Then you would make a cable from a matching plug, (e.g. if you have a 14-20R receptacle then a 14-20P plug) to Schuko inline coupler to fit the machine. The line and neutral terminals of the coupler will connect to the X and Y terminals of the plug. Because the inlet on the machine is non-polarised, it does not matter that both wires will be hot, instead of hot and neutral.

Larger 240V outlets such as 30A and 50A rated types used for stoves and dryers will supply the necessary power but the breaker will not offer adequate protection to the machine cable. You would need to down-rate the circuit to say 20A or add a local breaker box with a smaller outlet.

Ensure codes are met regarding ground fault protection if required.
I have to agree with @Lucien and good luck with your project
 
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Typical residential supplies in the USA are 120V / 240V split-phase with two hot wires and a neutral. Domestic appliances typically use one hot and neutral for 120V, but stoves, dryers, A/C etc use the two hots to supply 240V and this configuration will power your apple grinder.

You will need a 240V grounded outlet to plug the machine into; it does not matter whether the outlet has a neutral or not, as the machine won't need it, only the two hots and ground. Therefore either of the two common types of 240V receptacle, type 6 (without neutral) or type 14 (with neutral) will suit. Then you would make a cable from a matching plug, (e.g. if you have a 14-20R receptacle then a 14-20P plug) to Schuko inline coupler to fit the machine. The line and neutral terminals of the coupler will connect to the X and Y terminals of the plug. Because the inlet on the machine is non-polarised, it does not matter that both wires will be hot, instead of hot and neutral.

Larger 240V outlets such as 30A and 50A rated types used for stoves and dryers will supply the necessary power but the breaker will not offer adequate protection to the machine cable. You would need to down-rate the circuit to say 20A or add a local breaker box with a smaller outlet.

Ensure codes are met regarding ground fault protection if required.
Thanks so much for taking the time to explain this. A friend recommended I use a step down transformer and a normal 120v outlet, would this be advisable?
 

Lucien Nunes

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That is also possible, although it is a step-up transformer you need (120 -> 230V) not step-down. The machine is rated at 1900W but we have to guess the power factor because it does not state the current (The current on the starter label is the starter rating, not the motor.) If we call the pf 0.85 at full load then the load on the transformer will be 1900/0.85=2.2kVA so you would want a transformer with a continuous rating of 2.5kVA or more. If the transformer efficiency is 90% then at full load, based on that guess of power factor, the current on the 120V input side will be just over 20A. In theory this is too high for any normal outlet branch circuit so you would need to put in a 30A 120V circuit to feed the transformer. In practice it is not going to run at full load continuously and we don't actually know the running current. But it's worth drawing that possibility of marginally overloading a 20A 120V outlet to your attention.
 

Marvo

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If it's a 'dumb' or anaolgue machine then as per Lucien it should run on the USA 240v split phase. If it's got internal electronics with any kind of coms it may need a low N-E voltage (<1.5v) in which case it might not work correctly or may even be damaged by a split phase supply. If it's got complex electronics built-in I'd play it safe by using an isolating transformer with one of the output legs referenced to ground.
 
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That is also possible, although it is a step-up transformer you need (120 -> 230V) not step-down. The machine is rated at 1900W but we have to guess the power factor because it does not state the current (The current on the starter label is the starter rating, not the motor.) If we call the pf 0.85 at full load then the load on the transformer will be 1900/0.85=2.2kVA so you would want a transformer with a continuous rating of 2.5kVA or more. If the transformer efficiency is 90% then at full load, based on that guess of power factor, the current on the 120V input side will be just over 20A. In theory this is too high for any normal outlet branch circuit so you would need to put in a 30A 120V circuit to feed the transformer. In practice it is not going to run at full load continuously and we don't actually know the running current. But it's worth drawing that possibility of marginally overloading a 20A 120V outlet to your attention.
Makes sense, thank you again for taking the time to explain everything so thoroughly, I appreciate it! I am unsure that I have a 240v outlet where I will be making the cider so this seems like it might be the only option
 
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That is also possible, although it is a step-up transformer you need (120 -> 230V) not step-down. The machine is rated at 1900W but we have to guess the power factor because it does not state the current (The current on the starter label is the starter rating, not the motor.) If we call the pf 0.85 at full load then the load on the transformer will be 1900/0.85=2.2kVA so you would want a transformer with a continuous rating of 2.5kVA or more. If the transformer efficiency is 90% then at full load, based on that guess of power factor, the current on the 120V input side will be just over 20A. In theory this is too high for any normal outlet branch circuit so you would need to put in a 30A 120V circuit to feed the transformer. In practice it is not going to run at full load continuously and we don't actually know the running current. But it's worth drawing that possibility of marginally overloading a 20A 120V outlet to your attention.
Another question, if going the transformer route what type of plug should I wire to? I have a friend who has offered to let me use this: https://www.amazon.com/Rockstone-5000-Watt-Transformer-Converter/dp/B00J0CF8W4
 

Avo Mk8

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Another question, if going the transformer route what type of plug should I wire to? I have a friend who has offered to let me use this: https://www.amazon.com/Rockstone-5000-Watt-Transformer-Converter/dp/B00J0CF8W4
That converter has a 'universal' output socket ?, which will accomodate a European Schuko male plug, the same format as is fitted to your apple grinder, so that seems an obvious choice.

A US 3-pin plug (as is fitted to the converter) might be a bad idea because someone is bound to plug your grinder in to a 110v socket at some point, and wonder why it doesn't work properly.
 

Lucien Nunes

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That converter has a 'universal' output socket ?, which will accomodate a European Schuko male plug,
Well the pins of the plug will fit but it won't make contact with the side earth contacts so not a good choice!. A NEMA 6-15P or 6-20P 240V plug might fit although as per the smiley those sockets don't always make good contact with anything. A UK 13A 240V plug would probably be OK.

Those low- cost transformers are a bit of a con, their rating is lower than the number suggests. E.g. the description for the 5kVA version says it's only suitable for appliances up to 3kVA. That makes it a 3kVA transformer in my book. But it should do your job, 120V input plug overload possibility notwithstanding.
 

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