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Evening All

Just quoting for a re-wire and the customer has asked if he can keep his original bakelite switches, not sure about this but guessing he can't as they don't conform to current BSEN. Can anyone point me the right direction??

Cheers in advance
 
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telectrix

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if they are the type where you can unscrew the cover without use of a tool, accessing live parts, then it's a no. otherwise, your call.
 

Pete999

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Evening All

Just quoting for a re-wire and the customer has asked if he can keep his original bakelite switches, not sure about this but guessing he can't as they don't conform to current BSEN. Can anyone point me the right direction??

Cheers in advance
Might find some difficulty in sourcing the wooden blocks for these switches Dave. Assuming they are installed on a wooden block.
 

Dave OCD

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I refitted two on a rewire for a young couple around 3 weeks ago, Crabtree with the wooden pattress, just parked the cpc in the hollow behind the pattress with a 2 port Ideal connector on it, fiddly things those. upload_2019-3-28_19-59-6.jpeg
 

Charlie_

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If they are the type that don’t conform with the current regs then you could go down the selv route and switch the lights via relays or even rf units
 
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Not mounted on a wooden block, there are 4 of them sunk into the wall with a bakelite faceplate covering them ( a 4 gang switch)
 

telectrix

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do you need a tool to access the live parts inside? a pic.would help.
 
D

Deleted member 26818

If they are existing equipment, re-using them would not be a departure.
 
I refitted two on a rewire for a young couple around 3 weeks ago, Crabtree with the wooden pattress, just parked the cpc in the hollow behind the pattress with a 2 port Ideal connector on it, fiddly things those. View attachment 48559
Hi Dave - I've made a fair few of these pattresses out using oak and a router. Originally, small holes were drilled immediately behind the terminal for a single core to pass through - is that how you did it? I always worry about the proximity to the terminal, but tend to drill a slightly larger hole. Just wondering if you had a better approach! (I've also considered spraying with some-kind of flame retardant).

(Apologies if this is considered 'post hijacking'. I've read the rules but assume this is ok. Lurked here for many years, not commented much but this sparked my interest!)
 

Dave OCD

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Hi Dave - I've made a fair few of these pattresses out using oak and a router. Originally, small holes were drilled immediately behind the terminal for a single core to pass through - is that how you did it? I always worry about the proximity to the terminal, but tend to drill a slightly larger hole. Just wondering if you had a better approach! (I've also considered spraying with some-kind of flame retardant).

(Apologies if this is considered 'post hijacking'. I've read the rules but assume this is ok. Lurked here for many years, not commented much but this sparked my interest!)
I actually reused the original pattresses, yes small holes were drilled through lining up with the switch terminals, the cores have to be pretty accurate on the length as you can't really ease slack back in behind, I've probably binned well over a hundred of these switches over the years, kind of wish I'd kept them now. :)
 

telectrix

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reminds me of my dad's house, built 1926, purchased in 1958. bakelite switches, VIR cables, asbestos backed fuses in wooden CU., all original installation from 1926. 15A round pin sockets, no fused plugs, house never burnt down. nobody got electrocuted; had to rewire socket circuits 1980 due to them new-fangled 1363 plugs on all new appliances. only fuse that ever blew was the DNO 30A rewireable. it popped soon after we swapped the coal fired cooker for an electric monstrosity. (1988). welling up now.i loved that cooker fed from the adjacent coal fire, until the cat decided to sleep in the oven and mother fired it up for sunday dinner. never seen a cat run so fast with it's fur smouldering.
 
S

Squid

You are both from Leeds....... is there a plush area? ;o))))
reminds me of my dad's house, built 1926, purchased in 1958. bakelite switches, VIR cables, asbestos backed fuses in wooden CU., all original installation from 1926. 15A round pin sockets, no fused plugs, house never burnt down. nobody got electrocuted; had to rewire socket circuits 1980 due to them new-fangled 1363 plugs on all new appliances. only fuse that ever blew was the DNO 30A rewireable. it popped soon after we swapped the coal fired cooker for an electric monstrosity. (1988). welling up now.i loved that cooker fed from the adjacent coal fire, until the cat decided to sleep in the oven and mother fired it up for sunday dinner. never seen a cat run so fast with it's fur smouldering.
Makes me feel old, mine was built in 1906.....
 
I’ve used the switches from “ Switch To Wood” as mentioned above. Really rather good, but really rather expensive too. In the right house they’re the mutts nuts.
 
If they are the type that don’t conform with the current regs then you could go down the selv route and switch the lights via relays or even rf units
I’ve been saying you can do this to fit metal light switches where there is no earth wire, for around 5 years!
Your the first other person I’ve ever heard suggest it!
 
D

Deleted member 26818

I’ve been saying you can do this to fit metal light switches where there is no earth wire, for around 5 years!
Your the first other person I’ve ever heard suggest it!
Frequently used in commercial installations.
 

Matthewd29

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I can't understand the appeal of them for some people they are old brown and ugly
 

freddo

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A friend had Edwardian light switches in his house, unearthed brass domes that easily unscrewed, and if you loosed the dome a turn or so the dome would rock enough to touch the live parts underneath! Awesome feel when operating though.

One of his very old lights was solid brass, screw in lampholders with the thread connected to the brass arms and wired with a single core to each lamp holder...
 

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