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Discuss Running Cable to Garage in the Advice for Professional Canadian Electricians area at ElectriciansForums.net

We are going to run Teck90 or ACWU cable underground from house to garage. There will be just a 60A breaker in the house and garage for now but want to lay a large enough cable to carry 100A in the future. We have approximately 60 ft of ACWU #3/0 aluminum to make the run. It is about 2" in diameter, the 3/0 conductors are close to 1/2" so it's over sized which will make it a little more work to install.
Some answers to my questions might make it easier.
- With the cable being just under 2" diameter what diameter does the PVC conduit have to be up to the LB fitting? Is 2 1/2" good enough? 4" seems like overkill.
- We need to run the 3/0 into a transition box, then come out of the box with #3AWG because the 3/0 won't fit the panel.
If I can't tame this configuration down a bit, maybe we'll just buy some ACWU with #3AWG copper.
 
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Spoon

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Mentor
Arms
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This is a UK based forum, so I’m afraid your terminology is getting lost in translation.
Have to admit, the OP has posted in the correct section of the forum.
I forgot we had a 'Non UK Electrical Works' section.
 

littlespark

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Arms
Esteemed
Advent Win
Thanks @Spoon , I know it now.... it’s right next to the non-electrician electrical works forum. AKA I did it myself but I’m going to blame the last spark forum, AKA it’s only 3 wires innit forum
 
Have to admit, the OP has posted in the correct section of the forum.
I forgot we had a 'Non UK Electrical Works' section.
I moved it this morning, going to try and keep all these that keep popping up in here.
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #7
My terminology gets lost any place I go but I was unaware this was a UK based forum! It's been a fun discussion but I need to zero in closer to home codes. So long from the land of the CEC.
 

Lister1987

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Trainee
Supporter
Advent Win
My terminology gets lost any place I go but I was unaware this was a UK based forum! It's been a fun discussion but I need to zero in closer to home codes. So long from the land of the CEC.
If you do find what you're after, come back and let us know so we can share that knowledge.
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #9
My original post is convoluted anyway. We are going to use ACWU #1AWG 3 Conductor.
 
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  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #10
I guess it's too late for me to edit my original post. It is not UK in nature, and was poorly written with incorrect terminology so I will revise it here:

We are thinking of running ACWU 3/0 AWG from house to garage (because it is free material). The #3/0 AWG is too big to work with in the panel so we would have to use a transition box. Can the LB be used for that?

Is using this free oversized material going to be more headache than it is worth? The CEC conductor ampacity chart says #1 AWG aluminum is good for 100A.

I will explain the acronyms in my next post. Thanks.
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #11
ACWU (not Ammalgamated Clothing Workers Union:) cable is for exposed and concealed wiring in dry or wet locations where exposed to the weather, and hazardous places. It has aluminum conductors, and a spiral flexible armor but no inner sheath around the conductor bundle.

TECK cable is of Canadian origin but used in many places around the world now. It has similar application but has copper conductors, an inner sheath, and a spiral flexible armor. 2 or 3 times more expensive than ACWU.

AWG: American Wire Gauge
LB: Stands for line box. It is often used at the point where you will begin pulling wire through the conduit.
CEC: Canadian Electrical Code

Have a good day UK.
 
Sometimes free is just too expensive, for such a short run just use the proper sized conductors, it will be a better and cleaner install. BTW, trying to splice 3/0 in a LB would be like trying to stuff 10 pounds of manure in a 5 pound bag, not sure about the CEC, but the NEC would not allow it, there is insufficient volume to do so.
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #14
Sometimes free is just too expensive, for such a short run just use the proper sized conductors, it will be a better and cleaner install. BTW, trying to splice 3/0 in a LB would be like trying to stuff 10 pounds of manure in a 5 pound bag, not sure about the CEC, but the NEC would not allow it, there is insufficient volume to do so.
LOL! I like that one, I'm going to use it. 10lbs into 5lb bag:)
I was going to use a six inch box instead of an LB. I would be transitioning to 1 AWG in the box using 1/2 split bolts. I would rather use the 1AWG for sure but I'm going to do the arithmatic because the TECK fittings etc. are more expensive and it might neutralize any savings anyway. Thanks
 

Matthewd29

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Arms
Esteemed
I guess it's too late for me to edit my original post. It is not UK in nature, and was poorly written with incorrect terminology so I will revise it here:

We are thinking of running ACWU 3/0 AWG from house to garage (because it is free material). The #3/0 AWG is too big to work with in the panel so we would have to use a transition box. Can the LB be used for that?

Is using this free oversized material going to be more headache than it is worth? The CEC conductor ampacity chart says #1 AWG aluminum is good for 100A.

I will explain the acronyms in my next post. Thanks.
Could have fooled me, I wouldn't have picked up on poor terminology as I am clueless about american/Canadian electrical practices
 
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