Discuss socket and switch box cutters. Any good? in the Electrical Tools and Products area at ElectriciansForums.net

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Hi

I am looking at the best tools to buy for chasing out and for sinking back boxes. Wall chasers are too heavy and dusty.

What does everyone think of the box cutters that go onto a SDS drill? (As seen in screwfix) Erbauer EBS Single Box Cutter


I am looking for something that makes this part easier. I have been using a multi tool for the plaster layer then a drill to go into the brick. looks neat but is so time consuming. Any suggestions gratfully received.
 
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Hilti wall chaser and vacuum system. I don't see many electricians with them, they are excellent; not cheap but by far my favourite tool.
 
got the armeg one aswel

only used a few times makes alot of dust and mess and some bricks it wont touch

i still use hammer and bolster more
 

HandySparks

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I'd agree with both above. Good except in hard brick, but I'm going to try to rig up some dust extraction for it.
 

Strima

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Anything but brick. As most modern houses are made of blockwork most jobs should be OK. Did some sockets in a house built in 1830, good old bricks held together with lime mortar, any form of vibration had them falling into the wall cavity so slow drill with hammer mode off and gently coax the brickwork out, that was fun...
 
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I Use the Armeg one - got it in a denmans deal which included the sds drill too (Hitachi) for about £100. Works well and Quite useful, especially if you have several to do at once.
 
I use Makita wall chaser with hoover, SDS wide chisel for the box, normal sds chisel for the channel after the chaser and a rounder chisel for going into the voids.

the chaser can be used directly on the box point for depth to speed things up and if the wall is being replastered. might have a look at one of those armegs.
 
K

KFH

I have the Thorsman version. Well made but the little allen screws holding the pilot drill in place keep on falling out despite me putting thread sealant on. The pilot drill has now broken and I have lost the allen screws. I may get the spares one day but I am ot missing it

It works great on block, is OKish on soft brick and not much use on hard brick.

I find the chaser better to set the depth (with vacuum cleaner) or a core drill to do the same and then an SDS chisel to finish it off. If the mortar is soft you can make more cuts so there is less chiseling.
 

Jimmy Boy

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Anything but brick. As most modern houses are made of blockwork most jobs should be OK. Did some sockets in a house built in 1830, good old bricks held together with lime mortar, any form of vibration had them falling into the wall cavity so slow drill with hammer mode off and gently coax the brickwork out, that was fun...
Strima out of interest what sort of cavity was it ? cavity wall construction as far as I know only took off in the 1900's, having been in the building trade for 25+ years I was curious mate.OP sorry for the high jack
J
 

Strima

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Strima out of interest what sort of cavity was it ? cavity wall construction as far as I know only took off in the 1900's, having been in the building trade for 25+ years I was curious mate.OP sorry for the high jack
J
Worked out the depth as a nine inch wall so not a huge gap, falling in was a bit of an extreme phrase to use. It was originally a brewery managers house with stable and tac room out the back, it looks like the property had been extended and added to over the years to the point of not knowing where the original fabric was, the north side of the building had it's floors roughly twelve inches lower than the southern side and the roof apex looked to hint towards the northern part being an addition.

It was an interesting job, I love working on old properties but haven't found that illusive box of gold watches or Nazi gold in the loft yet... :lol:
 

ruston

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Years since I used one , only any good in block and as messy as F (means as much muck as you can get) they may have changed since then , but I would'nt want to use one except on a new build.
 

ruston

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Worked out the depth as a nine inch wall so not a huge gap, falling in was a bit of an extreme phrase to use. It was originally a brewery managers house with stable and tac room out the back, it looks like the property had been extended and added to over the years to the point of not knowing where the original fabric was, the north side of the building had it's floors roughly twelve inches lower than the southern side and the roof apex looked to hint towards the northern part being an addition.

It was an interesting job, I love working on old properties but haven't found that illusive box of gold watches or Nazi gold in the loft yet... :lol:
Found a WW1 bayonet once in a town house under boards, left it there for posterity . loads of wasps nests too lol.
 
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