Discuss Sub Board fed from a plug top, EICR Coding in the Electrical Wiring, Theories and Regulations area at ElectriciansForums.net

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I recently undertook an EICR report for a small house and the conservatory extension had a separate fuseboard which was fed from a 13A plug top.

Obviously this is not ideal but when coming to code it I couldn’t describe why it is any more than a C3.

The main distribution board feeding the socket that the sub-board plugs into is RCD protected. Surely any fault that could occur from circuits after the sub-board are then RCD protected, any overloading etc of the plug top is protected by the both the MCB at the main board and the 13A fuse in the plug.

Can anyone more experienced point me to what (of anything) I would be doing classifying it as a C3?
 
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telectrix

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can't see any danger (except prerhaps trip hazard) so agree with C3. may be a comment that the sub has temp. plug-in feed .
 
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Thank you all for your inputs so far.

Is there anyone who disagrees with a C3?

The sub-board had 4 circuits:- 2 x Radial socket (each supplying one socket) 1 x Lighting (supplying 2 wall lights) and 1 x 20A air conditioning unit.
 

Paignton pete

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Thank you all for your inputs so far.

Is there anyone who disagrees with a C3?

The sub-board had 4 circuits:- 2 x Radial socket (each supplying one socket) 1 x Lighting (supplying 2 wall lights) and 1 x 20A air conditioning unit.
Just the 20A rated air conditioning would possibly incur the C2 potential for overload. What is the load of the air conditioning unit.
13 A plug top with its bottom feeding a higher rated isolator is fine if loading is less than the lowest so C3 but.... It’s screaming in my sub conciseness for a C2.

loved the code S for silly Wilco.
come across these Types of issues all the time.
I think, Why do that, but When you really look and examine the situation it’s not dangerous, just silly.
 

James

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I would treat it like any other DB
List the supply characteristics, incoming fuse type and rating etc.

It is in many ways similar to a caravan or temporary building.
Fixed wiring and distribution, fed from a socket that is part of a larger installation
 
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Just the 20A rated air conditioning would possibly incur the C2 potential for overload. What is the load of the air conditioning unit.
13 A plug top with its bottom feeding a higher rated isolator is fine if loading is less than the lowest so C3 but.... It’s screaming in my sub conciseness for a C2.

loved the code S for silly Wilco.
come across these Types of issues all the time.
I think, Why do that, but When you really look and examine the situation it’s not dangerous, just silly.
Something doesn’t seem right with me classing it as only a C3 either!

The loading of the air conditioning unit shouldn’t matter should it? If it pulls more than 13A the plug top would blow.

My concern is the 1.5mm flex cable that is on the plug top could overheat if too much current is drawn .. but the fuse would operate if there was any danger? Or am I wrong in assuming the 1363 fuse is adequate?
 

telectrix

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also depends on the 1.5mm flex. the 1363 fuse will carry a fair overcurrent for a while, causing the flex to overheat. giong by the 20A A/C load, i might lean towards a C2. what if the flex happened to be on the floor and a rug placed over it?
 

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