Discuss Switch spur behind fridge what can you do in the Electrical Forum area at ElectriciansForums.net

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Delboy247

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I installed a switch spur behind fridge customer was not impressed, but what can you do in this situation I assured him it was perfectly fine, no cupboards next to fridge only way round it to make the fridge sit flush anyone else had a situation like this.
 
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Octopus

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  • #2
What does the switch spur control?
 
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Delboy247

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  • #3
It controls the fridge itself it's not integrated as far as I knew it was a bog standard fridge apparently it's a deeper fridge far better than the others.
 
This doesnt make much sense I'm afraid, we cant really offer any advice when the details are very vague, why was he not impressed, what is that actual problem?...
 
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Delboy247

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  • #5
Exactly my point when the fridge goes wrong who will disconnect it, I read the manual and it does state you can cut the plug off for this situation
 
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jumpin jax

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  • #6
How often do fridges go wrong? Hardly ever really. It can always be isolated at the CU if its an emergency.
 
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Delboy247

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  • #7
What about when they want to defrost it for cleaning purposes tragic.
 
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jumpin jax

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  • #8
Most fridges have controls inside the door, not that tragic really
 
Nothing actually wrong with it as such, other than the customer may feel that if they ever want to replace it, or it needs to be removed for repair/new floor etc., they would then need an electrician to disconnect it.
I know that everyone has their own preferences, but I like to keep sockets in the fabric of the building, so will put the socket either behind the appliance (if there's room) with an isolator above the worktop, or behind an adjacent cupboard and cut a hole in the back for access. I realise these options weren't open to you and you did what was necessary, so you could always appease the customer by offering to disconnect it for free if that's ever required.
 

HandySparks

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Just change it for a single socket, put a plug back on the fridge cable and let the customer work out how to fit the fridge in.
 
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Adam W

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  • #11
I believe it is customary to install the switched fused spur above the worktop, controlling an unswitched socket outlet under the worktop which the fridge plugs straight into.

.... Unless it's a trick question?
 

HandySparks

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I believe it is customary to install the switched fused spur above the worktop, controlling an unswitched socket outlet under the worktop which the fridge plugs straight into.

.... Unless it's a trick question?
I'm guessing that as it's not a built-in appliance, the OP intended to install just a socket, but as the fridge turned out to be deep one, was trying to help the customer out by fitting a SFS instead (lower profile than a plug and socket).
 
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dim_bulb

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  • #13
Why not recess socket in wall I'm guessing it was surface switch spur?
 
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Guest55

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  • #14
You made a decision that you thought was in the customers best interest , not your fault he has an awkward sized appliance , so dont beat yourself up over it pal.
 
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Adam W

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  • #15
If you had reason to install it that way it's down to you to explain to the customer why you've installed it that way. You could end up in a massive argument which will end up with you saying 'well if I could have done that then I would have.
All part and parcel of dealing with the general public I'm afraid.
 
I know that this doesn't help, but I always talk a customer through how I plan to do each job. The number of times I get "oh, I don't want it done like that!", then we manage to find a good compromise, has saved me a world of hassle in the past. Although we are the professionals, and sometimes there are limited options, it is still their home at the end of the day.
 
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Octopus

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  • #17
I know that this doesn't help, but I always talk a customer through how I plan to do each job. The number of times I get "oh, I don't want it done like that!", then we manage to find a good compromise, has saved me a world of hassle in the past. Although we are the professionals, and sometimes there are limited options, it is still their home at the end of the day.
I always do this with the position of downlights!
 
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SirKit Breaker

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  • #18
Is there an adjacent cupboard you could put it in. I am not being picky, but this does contravene some reg or other with regard to disconnecting in an emergency, or for maintenance etc. I agree with others, fridges dont go wrong often (unless you IR the ring with it connected like i did) and most self defrost, but you can never say never.

Regards,

Howard
 
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sparks1973

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  • #19
I know that this doesn't help, but I always talk a customer through how I plan to do each job. The number of times I get "oh, I don't want it done like that!", then we manage to find a good compromise, has saved me a world of hassle in the past. Although we are the professionals, and sometimes there are limited options, it is still their home at the end of the day.
well thats consultation with a customer isn`t it......the same would apply to that imposed on an inspection & test....as in `limitations`....
 
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Guest55

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  • #20
Rule No. 1 - The customer is always clueless and their wishes / ideas should be ignored at all costs.

If i decide that 32way 400v dis-board is to be fitted above a lounge fireplace its because i've used my highly honed engineering judgement and it shouldnt dared to be questioned thank you very much.
;-D
 
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sedgy34

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  • #22
I would extend it so its around 1400mm from the floor next to the fridge not behind it.
Customers ehh don't you just love them you do what's best and it's not what they want
 
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Spazz

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  • #23
put the socket in the cupboard next to the fridge and cut a hole big enough for the plug to go through - this will get past the problem with a deeper fridge than normal and complies.
With this you may not need an isolation above the worktop as it can be easily isolated from the cupboard. - personally I would still put an isolation above
 
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sedgy34

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  • #24
put the socket in the cupboard next to the fridge and cut a hole big enough for the plug to go through - this will get past the problem with a deeper fridge than normal and complies.
With this you may not need an isolation above the worktop as it can be easily isolated from the cupboard. - personally I would still put an isolation above
Too much extra work going on here do you do it for free or does customer pay you for unnessasary works
 
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Spazz

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  • #25
First I would of measured the fridge to make sure it fits tidy then work out where the socket goes - if I have to go back because the customer is not happy - if they just being picky then they have to pay - if I dont something wrong then I would have to go back free
 
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jumpin jax

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  • #26
In the OP it states that are not any cupboards next to the fridge
 

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