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Discuss What would happen if? in the Electrical Wiring, Theories and Regulations area at ElectriciansForums.net

M

markthespark

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Hi i was havin a conversation with some lads at work today about what would happen if you connected the 12v secondary side of the tranny to a 230v supply, would you get a really high voltage but low current out of the primary side, acting like a step up transformer??

i have very limited knowledge on transformers and would be interested to know?

Muchas grassy arse:)
 
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W

wayne

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #3
the kind of thing you do once if you are daft
 
M

MacSparky

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  • #5
Why not? i thought primary and secondary windings were the same csa.
Regards
MacSparky:)
 
G

Grae79

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  • #6
if i had one in the van i'd give it a go
 
M

MacSparky

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  • #7
The thing is if it did work how would you test it as the voltage would be around 2760 volts ( i think):(.... wheres Tony when you need him.
Regards
MacSparky:)
 
T

treelectric

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #8
This would not work. Check the resistances of the pri and sec windings. You will find the are in the ratio of about 20 to 1, the sec about 1/20 of the primary, so connecting this to 240 would melt it.
Also 12 volt sec at 1 amp would mean the primary would only draw a current of 1/20 amp at 240 volts, so the primary dooes not need so much csa as the secondary for this transformer.
The VA rating of the transformer for 1 amp at 12 volts will be 12VA. Since the VA rating is the same for pri and sec windings, then for the primary at 240v, the current will be 12/240 which is 1/20th amp.
So for any transformer, VxA on one side will equal VxA on the other, so you can work it all out if you know one side.
 
M

MacSparky

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  • #9
Nice bit of info treelectric;)
 
S

Shakey

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  • #11
This would not work. Check the resistances of the pri and sec windings. You will find the are in the ratio of about 20 to 1, the sec about 1/20 of the primary, so connecting this to 240 would melt it.
Also 12 volt sec at 1 amp would mean the primary would only draw a current of 1/20 amp at 240 volts, so the primary dooes not need so much csa as the secondary for this transformer.
The VA rating of the transformer for 1 amp at 12 volts will be 12VA. Since the VA rating is the same for pri and sec windings, then for the primary at 240v, the current will be 12/240 which is 1/20th amp.
So for any transformer, VxA on one side will equal VxA on the other, so you can work it all out if you know one side.

Dont quite agree with the resistances side of things. Obviously we are talking about impedence rather than resistance

And Xl = 2 Pi FL

the L is fixed for the coil, and the frequency hasnt changed. Therefore the Xl of the coil is the same, regardless of which V we apply to it. Obviously the I drawn will relate to the V applied, and the Xl of the coil will mean it will draw whatever I it needs. The coil MAY be able to handle this, it may not, depending on the VA rating of the tranny

It isnt 'automatically' going to blow!!!;)
 
G

Grae79

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #12
this is the reply I got back from Aurora's technical department with regards to their electronic transformers: "I suspect that if you were to put 230VAC into the output terminals of a transformer then nothing would happen that you can see. It would however blow the surge protection fuses within the transformer and probably burnout the terminals meaning that the transformer would be unusable"
 
S

Shakey

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #13
this is the reply I got back from Aurora's technical department with regards to their electronic transformers: "I suspect that if you were to put 230VAC into the output terminals of a transformer then nothing would happen that you can see. It would however blow the surge protection fuses within the transformer and probably burnout the terminals meaning that the transformer would be unusable"

Nah,,,,,,what do they know;)
 

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