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Discuss Wiring for new 16 Amp oven in the Electrical Appliances Forum area at ElectriciansForums.net

Beeg

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Evening all, apologies if this is in the wrong forum or has been asked before.

I have ordered a new oven thinking I could just plug it in to 13amp socket same as my old one. However I checked today and the oven is 16amp and therefore should have its own dedicated circuit.
I checked the instructions for the old oven and turns out that is also 16amp, however it has been connected to 13amp socket.

I understand that using 3 core flex to connect the new oven to a 3 pin socket does not conform to regulations, and I do not intend on doing so.
But if the plug was fitted with 13amp fuse, would this not adequately protect the cable from over current? Assuming the oven was at full load and drawing 16amps, would the plug top fuse simply blow causing a minor annoyance at dinner parties?

I must stress again that I have no intention on doing it this way, I just have a keen interest in electrical theory and want to know for my own satisfaction

Thanks in advance
Beeg
 
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James

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it may well work just fine, 16A will be the current draw whilst every element is on at the same time. however I WOULD NOT RECCOMEND doing so.
note, the time the fuse will blow is in the middle of cooking x-mass dinner, when the fuse is warm from being under load for a long time and you turn everything up to finish it off.

sods law and physics working in harmony.

Dedicated circuit is the way forwards.
 

James

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But are they implying that a 13A switched spur is ok
16A is the key,
standard 13A plug is a no
13A spur is a no
16A socket could be done
16A isolator is ok.
simple, supply has to be greater than manufacturer's instructions.
No If's, No buts. if you want it to comply and be safe, follow the manufacturers instructions.
 
Last edited:

Wilko

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Hi - as above, use manufacturer’s installation instructions as your guide. No plug and socket for a 16A oven please. By the by, a 13A fuse won’t melt at 13A as that’s it’s rated working current. What we perhaps can’t be sure of is what size flex is used. So the fuse will protect against a short circuit, but maybe not a small (but long term) overload. There are fuse current vs time graphs around if you’d like to dig further :) .
 

Beeg

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DIY
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #10
Thanks everybody.

I suspected it wasn’t right, even though the existing one is 16amp connected to a wall socket.

I haven’t had chance to look but did wonder if it was possible that the socket was on a dedicated 16A radial circuit , but as I understand it the socket would only be rated to 13A? And even then the safety of the cable is relying on the fuse blowing in time?

Apologies if that’s a load of bo****ks ^^
 

Beeg

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DIY
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #14
Hi - as above, use manufacturer’s installation instructions as your guide. No plug and socket for a 16A oven please. By the by, a 13A fuse won’t melt at 13A as that’s it’s rated working current. What we perhaps can’t be sure of is what size flex is used. So the fuse will protect against a short circuit, but maybe not a small (but long term) overload. There are fuse current vs time graphs around if you’d like to dig further :) .
Just had a quick look at the current v time graphs and apparently a 13A fuse can have 20A through it and not blow :eek:
 
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