uHeat Banner - Forum Discount Available
This official sponsor may provide discounts for members

Discuss Wiring to replace old room thermostat to new digital in the Central Heating Systems area at ElectriciansForums.net

Welcome to ElectriciansForums.net - The American Electrical Advice Forum
Head straight to the main forums to chat by click here:  American Electrical Advice Forum

I’m replacing a tatty old mechanical Drayton room thermostat with a sleek digital Flomasta 7635G.
Could a wise wizard please help decipher the code known as the wiring diagram in the pictures attached.
Theoretically, given the ‘standard’ wallplate, I should just remove the old and pop on the new. But the diagrams got me concerned especially since the wiring is T&E but should be 3&E(?).
My understanding for the new kit is this: brown (L) to COM (1), green/yellow (SL) to ON (3) and blue (N) to (4) as it isn’t used.
BUT, on the old unit, blue looks to be SL(?) and g/y looks to be Neutral(?)
Could anybody clarify.
DIY jobs should never be so difficult. I’ve done washing machines/dishwashers/microwaves/vacuums, but this!!!
Thank you all in advance.

84231EE5-6947-412D-81EE-1FBF07DEFD9D.jpeg E6709EB7-88F0-474D-B80F-DC3FE24CA2CC.jpeg
 
Electrical2Go - Online Electrical Supplier
This official sponsor may provide discounts for members

James

-
Mentor
Arms
Supporter
Esteemed
You need a cable with 3 cores plus earth.
1 live
2 neutral
3 switch live
4 earth
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #4
some where on the information sheet ,consult a spark .
Thanks buzz, guess that’s why I’m here :)
Post automatically merged:

You need a cable with 3 cores plus earth.
1 live
2 neutral
3 switch live
4 earth
Thanks James, was kinda expecting that answer.
Next question then, where does the SL wire get connected at the other end in the fused connector, see picture.
 

Attachments

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #5
Thanks buzz, guess that’s why I’m here :)
Post automatically merged:


Thanks James, was kinda expecting that answer.
Next question then, where does the SL wire get connected at the other end in the fused connector, see picture.
Actually skip that, just realised it wired directly to the combo boiler. This fast snowballing. Would a wireless be any simpler?
Post automatically merged:

Thanks buzz, guess that’s why I’m here :)
Post automatically merged:


Thanks James, was kinda expecting that answer.
Next question then, where does the SL wire get connected at the other end in the fused connector, see picture.
Actually skip that, just realised it wired directly to the combo boiler. This fast snowballing. Would a wireless be any simpler?
Source URL: Wiring to replace old room thermostat to new digital - https://www.electriciansforums.net/threads/wiring-to-replace-old-room-thermostat-to-new-digital.178683/#post-1574814
Post automatically merged:

Thanks buzz, guess that’s why I’m here :)
Post automatically merged:


Thanks James, was kinda expecting that answer.
Next question then, where does the SL wire get connected at the other end in the fused connector, see picture.
Actually skip that, just realised it wired directly to the combo boiler. This fast snowballing. Would a wireless be any simpler?
 

Paignton pete

-
Arms
Esteemed
Can you show a bit more of the original thermostat photo.
In particular is that twin and earth and is the earth being used as a live conductor direct into the boiler.

Agree with above scrap this thermostat and get a wireless one. Much simpler.
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #8
Existing programmer integrated with boiler is a manual dial clock type, where you depress buttons to select the duration for which you require heating. Nothing digital, after all it’s a 20 yr old Worcester Bosch 28cdi.
Post automatically merged:

Can you show a bit more of the original thermostat photo.
In particular is that twin and earth and is the earth being used as a live conductor direct into the boiler.

Agree with above scrap this thermostat and get a wireless one. Much simpler.
Thanks Pete. Yes to T&E, by the looks of it, E being connected to N. Really bizarre.
 

Paignton pete

-
Arms
Esteemed
Existing programmer integrated with boiler is a manual dial clock type, where you depress buttons to select the duration for which you require heating. Nothing digital, after all it’s a 20 yr old Worcester Bosch 28cdi.
Post automatically merged:


Thanks Pete. Yes to T&E, by the looks of it, E being connected to N. Really bizarre.
Blizzard and wrong. Even though it functionally works.
You won’t be able to wire your new thermostat as is.

Wireless is the way forward I’m afraid.
 

Lucien Nunes

-
Mentor
Arms
Esteemed
Traditional bimetal room stats required a neutral to operate the accelerator resistor, essentially a tiny heating element inside the thermostat to help it stay thermally in step with the room as it warms. The current from these is small, a milliamp or two, so people bodged them by using the bare or G/Y core of T+E as the neutral, although 3c+E would have been correct for an installation where only COM, N/O and N were to be connected. This bodge was more prevalent where a 3-position motorised valve was in use that required both the N/O and N/C contacts of the stat, as there were then 4 live conductors (COM, N/O, N/C and N) and this was achieved with 3c+E again using the bare core as N. This was never compliant with regulations as all live conductors, including neutral, must be individually insulated.

Mains-powered electronic stats and timeswitches also need an N to power the electronics so the same requirements exist. You need 3 insulated cores L, SL & N and T+E does not give you that. An alternative to fully wireless would be a battery-powered stat / programmer, that does not need a neutral as its electronics are powered from the battery. That will require just L & SL which your existing cable will provide, thereby avoiding possible wireless connectivity problems.
 
Blizzard and wrong. Even though it functionally works.
You won’t be able to wire your new thermostat as is.

Wireless is the way forward I’m afraid.
There are loads of battery powered wired thermostats that don't need a neutral, but wireless I only know of one, Nest e is wireless and battery powered, but don't know of any others. The Flomasta 22199SX is two wired battery powered programmable thermostat at £35 the Nest e is £179 if you want OpenTherm or internet connections or to link to thermostatic radiator valves then yes Nest e is good. But just to get two wire working that is going OTT.
 
Aico 3000 Range
This official sponsor may provide discounts for members

Reply to Wiring to replace old room thermostat to new digital in the Central Heating Systems area at ElectriciansForums.net

Top Bottom