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Morning all,
Odd one...I’ve recently started out on my own I’m with nic-eic and have a good amount of experience and knowledge, looking at my diary this week I have several jobs including outdoor lighting and two Cu changes including incorporating a garage sub main.
My question is do any of you guys feel nervous about upcoming jobs like somehow you’re not good enough or doubt yourself like you’re going to mess things up or burn the house down.

I know this is probably odd for most of you But I just wondered if anyone else felt the same before a “larger” job. Think I’m just a nervous and doubtful person as I’ve never actually burnt anyone’s house down 😂🙈
 
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SparkyAndGeorge

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Arms
Advent Win
Just remember to know your limits. Nothing wrong in not being confident in a particular area just be honest with the person asking you to do the work. And as your experience grows, so will your confidence. Do you have a more experienced guy or mentor you can call for advice?
 

Massive1

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Trainee
Although not an electrican as yet but have another trade & I have always suffered social anxiety, always think I am being judged, what if they dont like my work etc & yes if I am put on a new job I literally crumble in the car.
 

Pete999

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Arms
Esteemed
I don't, but then, again I don't work any more, personally I think it's only natural to worry, but in saying that, I'm a long time worrier anyway, think by worrying it makes you more careful with your work. or it did me.
I wouldn't worry to much about worrying, don't be over confident though, check and check again, good luck.
 

Andy78

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Mentor
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I had self doubt when starting my own work, mainly stemming from a move into domestic work when I had little experience in this area, but also because I'd never run a business before so even the day to day doings were alien to me.
I also tend to be a worrying type of personality so know where you're coming from. From my own experience newly self employed anxiety is normal but fades over time as your confidence in yourself grows in all aspects of running a business.

It helped me to just stop for a few minutes and think jobs through logically from start to finish. This is a good technique to develop anyway as it helps you quickly visualise jobs when you are quoting for them.

Just remember you're the best spark on the job so there's no better person to be doing it :grin:

If you've got any specific worries about your work, or just want to run jobs through from A to B, I'm sure the forum will listen and offer helpful advice.
 
Nerves calm down as experience grows. However don’t become complacent, that’s when things go wrong and cause you to loose face.
 

Midwest

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Arms
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Ditto that; working as a sole trader, means you have no one else to turn to for advice or solace, but yourself. I can recall, being concerned and hoping things go as planned.

Thats why this forum is useful to bounce around ideas.

PS seems you've a lot to get through with this week? Times money I suppose.
 

Baddegg

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Arms
Supporter
Esteemed
Advent Win
Stick with it mate, these people have given you the work over someone else so they trust you.....as others have said take your time plan jobs carefully and thoughtfully (I still run through the job after I’ve finished to make sure I have done everything) the longer you do it the easier it becomes, you’ll look back in a year or two and wonder what you were fretting about, and as @Pete999 says a bit of worrying keeps you careful and stops complacency....good luck mate

Edit...I would add never let anxiety hold ya back things are rarely as bad as you think they gonna be, get stuck in!
 
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Thanks so much guys! All your kind words and advice have made me feel much better now. Hope you all have a good week at work!
thanks again.
 

Pete999

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Arms
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Thanks so much guys! All your kind words and advice have made me feel much better now. Hope you all have a good week at work!
thanks again.
Thanks but I won't, have a good week at work that is lol.
 

stevethesparks

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Arms
Esteemed
I still get nervous drilling out someones newly plastered ceiling for down-lights. Regardless of the plans I draw out and double measuring. I have 35 to drill and fit on Tuesday :confused:
 

happyhippydad

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Arms
Esteemed
Thanks so much guys! All your kind words and advice have made me feel much better now. Hope you all have a good week at work!
thanks again.
I know exactly what you mean Peter. This is exactly how I felt when starting out 7 years ago. I still remember walking into my first ever customers door feeling like a complete fraud and scared stiff (whilst trying to maintain an air of confidence). It was to fix a faulty light. The quote had cost me £5 off rated people and I only charged them £15 for the job but I walked out of there feeling fantastic after fixing their light and also with a tenner profit. The same job now would cost £50!

I think this is a normal feeling and shows that you care about doing a good job. These 'nervous' feelings (for me anyway) slowly disappeared over time. I don't feel nervous now about approaching any domestic electrical job, however I would say it took 2-3 years before feeling this way. During those 2-3 years the nervous feeling slowly diminishes without you really noticining that you are slowly getting less nervous.

A good question. Good for you for asking it :)
 
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Bob Geldoff1234

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Arms
Esteemed
I still get nervous drilling out someones newly plastered ceiling for down-lights. Regardless of the plans I draw out and double measuring. I have 35 to drill and fit on Tuesday :confused:
One of the best tricks of the trade my electrician father taught me when drilling out spot lights is to use a bent piece of wire(the type suspended ceiling are put up with). Bend the end of the wire to half the diameter of your spot light so that it is at 90 degrees right angle.
wire.png Make a small hole in the centre of your intended spot light and gently insert the bent wire up into the hole.Make it drop down on the other side of the plaster board and then spin it around.If it hits anything then you can move your spot light over with out having damaged the ceiling.Repeat on remaining spot lights and if there all clear then drill away.

I also use the DADE dust catcher when drilling spots.It saves alot of mess.
Hope that helps some of you!
 

Andy78

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Mentor
Arms
Esteemed
I still get nervous drilling out someones newly plastered ceiling for down-lights. Regardless of the plans I draw out and double measuring. I have 35 to drill and fit on Tuesday :confused:
I'm ok with downlights having usually measured thrice. Keep meaning to get a laser......it's on the list.

What does give me squeeky bum time is drilling up behind 100+ year old plaster coving which can extend down a foot from the ceiling. A regular occurrence in the properties I work in.
 
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