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Discuss Is Part 'P' enforceable? in the Electrical Wiring, Theories and Regulations area at ElectriciansForums.net

Bob Geldoff1234

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I recently wired an extension for a customer and certified it and notified Part'P' Building control so all good.
As I was working on this extension the neighbour from across the street came in to have a nosey.
Anyway the upshot is the builder is building an extension for the neighbour at the moment.When speaking to the builder I thought I might get the job of wiring his extension but evidently the neighbour himself is wiring it.He is not a qualified electrician and doesn't belong to any scheme.I have told the builder that he cannot wire his own extension without getting the council to certify it and inspect it at all the stages.This,he has not done.
So my question is,when the building inspector asks for the part 'P' certificate he obviously cannot give one.Is the house owner breaking the law? Could the council make him rip it out? If they accept an EICR instead then it makes a mockery of Part 'p'?
What is everyone's thoughts on this?
 
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snowhead

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Mentor
He won't get a Completion Certificate from building control without proof the electrical work is compliant.
It'll just sit with Building Control as not yet complete and he won't be able to sell it.
He'll have to go down the "Electrician has disappeared and not notified it" route.
 

Des 56

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If there is full plans approval then as far as I know the electrical inspections are paid as part of that fee

when the building inspector asks for the part 'P' certificate

In my experience all he will ever expect is a installation certificate ! He would then take no action to check from whence it came but would go away happy that his responsibilities have been discharged

If they accept an EICR instead then it makes a mockery of Part 'p'
Part P needed no one to make it a mockery that was self evident from the outset

Could the council make him rip it out
Theoretically yes they can,but realistically no,they would do all they can to get someone to accept responsibility for the installation
 

buzzlightyear

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Arms
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now bobs worth,lol, if the council asks him and he has nowt ,I agree what the others are saying if they except a EICR ,what is the point in Fart P.
 

ashrow

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Arms
A lot of domestic electrical works are not under part p ie minor works (ie extending an existing circuit)
Also if LABC do not pass off works then when time to sell up they can buy planning permission indemnity insurance, which in some cases is so much cheaper then doing it the right way
 

Bob Geldoff1234

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  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #6
The last building inspector I spoke to wanted me to send him the Part 'P' certificate directly to him so he could sign it off.He said waiting for the NIC's notification from them took a few weeks delay.He never asked to see the installation certificate!.
It really gets my goat that I have to jump through all different hoops to be qualified and safe and yet no one gets in trouble when jokers like this do their own work.I despair:(
 

Des 56

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I was registered 2 days ago and found during my time that competitors ( some of them mates)they had no problems at all after doing notifiable work whilst not registered

Registration is also a voluntary means of complying
Because someone is not registered it does not mean they are not qualified or are a cowboy installer
Its a personal and business decision whether to register,it has never been compulsory,maybe that is why it was all doomed from the outset many years ago,its likely only us doers of "what should be" are at all concerned and in hindsight we were always the mugs who did it right
 

ashrow

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Arms
just to make a note......some building inspectors dont know what they are asking for either.
I had job where a engineer spec'ed a steel RSJ but i could not carry out the work until the LABC had those calculations checked by a out sourced company. i asked the inspector about her qualifications and she had none related to building, engineering etc etc so they had to double check things !!!
What a waste of money
 

Megawatt

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Arms
Advent Win
The last building inspector I spoke to wanted me to send him the Part 'P' certificate directly to him so he could sign it off.He said waiting for the NIC's notification from them took a few weeks delay.He never asked to see the installation certificate!.
It really gets my goat that I have to jump through all different hoops to be qualified and safe and yet no one gets in trouble when jokers like this do their own work.I despair:(
Bob had he done that in the US and the local code enforcement found out he would be took to court and probably fined him $ 500.00 plus the state would get their state investigator to go out and investigate the job himself and yes he can have it took loose. Then charge him for that service of doing it over.
 

pirate

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Arms
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Ashrow, I had the same scenario. The architect specified an RSJ, but correctly farmed it out to a structural engineer to give the exact spec.
The builder (and i use that term loosely) was in the process of installing the RSJ when the architect turned up, measured it and rejected it. The builder simply shrugged, said he had it in store and it would do the job. BC arrived and the lad said he had no experience so had to go with the structural engineers spec.
The new one arrived 3 days later, and it was massively bigger...all the builder said was it had cost him £80.
Had the architect not been on hand, half an hour later the RSJ would have been in place, covered over, and no-one would have known any better....until the Grand Piano fell through the floor into the garage below!
 

remedial

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Trainee
Building control is a joke. I saw a post on a facebook group saying that where notifiable work is done, one labc tells builders to get an electrician to certify the work after its done, knowing that no electrician was involved in the installation
 

buzzlightyear

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Arms
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Bob had he done that in the US and the local code enforcement found out he would be took to court and probably fined him $ 500.00 plus the state would get their state investigator to go out and investigate the job himself and yes he can have it took loose. Then charge him for that service of doing it over.
1567452757514.png lol. :D four bleating words
 

DPG

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Advent Win
Bob had he done that in the US and the local code enforcement found out he would be took to court and probably fined him $ 500.00 plus the state would get their state investigator to go out and investigate the job himself and yes he can have it took loose. Then charge him for that service of doing it over.
Sounds a better way to deal with things that.
 

buzzlightyear

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I remember a few years ago when finished a new building ,gets a call its the building inspector have got your member number and test cert number not even finished the job .
Post automatically merged:

I was registered 2 days ago
wow ,try since 2005 john fat watch me belly punch out presctot ,love the guy
 
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